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34 results for "Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society"
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Record #:
5149
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William Campbell Dickison died November 22,1999, in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Dickison, an internationally known plant morphologist and plant anatomist, joined the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Biology Department in 1969. He was also a former editor of the Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society from 1975 to 1981.
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4424
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A train struck Gerald McCarthy, the first biologist of the North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station, while he collected plants on October 11, 1892. He was severely injured; deafness prevented his hearing the train's approach. Yet deafness did not prevent an outstanding biological career. His accomplishments include contributing to the early development of the national seed-testing standard and the creation of the North Carolina Crop-Pest Control Commission.
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4425
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Vascular flora of Bogue Banks and the Cape Lookout National Seashore totals 521 species within 312 genera and 114 families. Fourteen of the species are listed by North Carolina as rare and endangered. An annotated list of species is included.
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Record #:
4429
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An oil/gas drill site, proposed by the Mobil Oil Corporation on North Carolina's Outer Continental Shelf, is a potential hazard to rare and globally endangered seabirds. The drill site area had been nominated as a globally Important Bird Area. The drill site would also affect the area's ecotourism, as a large birdwatching industry has developed on the Outer Banks. A number of endangered species and described by the author.
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Record #:
3928
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The coyote's range is expanding. In the early 1980s, the animal was found in only four of the state's one hundred counties. By 1998, it had almost covered the state. Impacts from such proliferation include increased human-animal encounters and threats to native wildlife.
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Record #:
3929
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From 1982 to 1996, the Poor Boy Shark Tournament was held at Shallotte Point. These tournaments were popular because sharks were plentiful, good sport, and good to eat. However, two things ended the tournament in 1996. First, because sharks were being overfished, there were plans to limit size and catch; and secondly, other fishing tournaments began to offer larger money prizes.
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Record #:
3628
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Cooperation between the New Zealand government and the pork industry resulted in more effective swine waste management practices. Consideration of such practices could provide ways to improve hog waste management in the state.
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Record #:
3037
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Larry Alston Whitford, who died October 6, 1995, exemplifies the spirit of the land-grant college--to educate the common man. From humble rural beginnings, he was graduated from NC State University and became a world-renowned psychologist.
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Record #:
2412
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Statewide, tornadoes are becoming stronger and more numerous, inflicting property destruction, injuries, and death. Between 1963 and 1992, the state averaged 15.3 tornadoes yearly, and in 1991 was ranked 22nd nationally in number of tornadoes.
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Record #:
2903
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Sixty-six species of mammals inhabit the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Since the data were collected in 1968, two new ones, the hoary bat and the coyote, have been recorded, and two others, the river otter and the red wolf, have been reintroduced.
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Record #:
2949
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On July 20, 1995, an adult male reef shark was caught approximately one kilometer east of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. The capture afforded the first documented data for this type of shark and indicated a range extension north of Florida waters.
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Record #:
3056
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Dr. Donald Benton Anderson, an outstanding teacher, scientist, researcher in biology, and administrator at North Carolina State University, died May 22, 1994. Among his many honors was the 1951 O. Max Gardner Award.
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Record #:
1297
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This survey, corroborating similar earlier studies in Florida, Louisiana, and Texas, notes that runoff input into a canal system lowers numbers and varieties of fish and invertebrates. The authors call for increased water flow through the canal system.
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Record #:
1296
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Hannah conducted stand tally and stem analysis samplings at Bent Creek and Coweeta watersheds in North Carolina to support conclusions concerning the past and future development of hardwood stands in the Southern Appalachians.
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