NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


6 results for Shark fishing
Currently viewing results 1 - 6
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
2746
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1919, shark fishing for profit began in the state. Products included tanned shark hide and fertilizer. When shark meat became popular in 1983, however, fishery regulation was needed to protect the species.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Jan/Feb 1996, p11-12, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3929
Author(s):
Abstract:
From 1982 to 1996, the Poor Boy Shark Tournament was held at Shallotte Point. These tournaments were popular because sharks were plentiful, good sport, and good to eat. However, two things ended the tournament in 1996. First, because sharks were being overfished, there were plans to limit size and catch; and secondly, other fishing tournaments began to offer larger money prizes.
Full Text:
Record #:
7762
Author(s):
Abstract:
At Shallotte Point, North Carolina, the Annual Poor Boy Shark Tournament is held for three days each year. It is the only shark fishing tournament held in North Carolina. In its fifth year, the tournament hosted 35 boats, and 118 fishermen who caught 87 sharks. Participants are warned of the dangerous that come with hunting shark, but they love the competition and of course, the food.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 3, Aug 1986, p24-25, il
Full Text:
Record #:
24341
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s government encouraged fishermen to outfit their boats for shark fishing. Now, regulators believe shark fishing is no longer a feasible market and environmentalists claim shark populations are being overfished. Shark fishermen are struggling to bounce back from the loss of their investments in the market.
Record #:
25500
Author(s):
Abstract:
UNC marine scientists identified and analyzed over 300 sharks seized from illegal shark fishing in the Galápagos. The fishermen were planning to sell the sharks because they have high market value in China for shark fin soup. Marine scientists acknowledge that fishermen need to eat and have jobs, but sharks are also an economic resource for tourism and diving operations.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
31487
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Shallotte Point Poor Boy Shark Tournament was North Carolina’s first registered shark tournament, launched October 2-3. Dave Smith of Whiteville was the tournament’s prize-winner, landing a 312-pound tiger shark. Marine scientist, Dr. Frank Schwartz, explained that sharks were in the process of migrating south and he had thought the tiger sharks had already gone to warmer waters.
Source: