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14 results for Tobacco--History
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Record #:
7748
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A 6,000 square foot museum to preserve the memory of tobacco farm life was established in Kenly. The museum houses collections which range from quilts to farm equipment. Admission is free.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 3, Aug 1986, p22-23, il
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Record #:
16472
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Although most are aware of current anxiety aroused by the question as to tobacco and health, many may not know that the controversy over the effects of tobacco has flared up periodically during the past four hundred years. Physicians, kings, preachers, laymen, and even popes have taken their stand on the subject. All of them have spoke, pro or con, on the score of what tobacco does for or against the consumer.
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Record #:
16845
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State archaeologists excavated pipe bowls from a Pamlico River site near Beaufort in the autumn of 1985. These bowls contained a residue that was tested by Dr. Alan Rodgman, director of Research and Development Section of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. Using specialized equipment, Dr. Rodgman dated the tobacco residue to about 800 A.D.
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Record #:
19662
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Upon her retirement in 1990, Rocky Mount native Mary Williams Barnes wrote her memoirs about growing up on her parents' tobacco farm in the 1930s and 1940s. Titled \"Tom and Betsy's Family,\" the book chronicles the importance of tobacco farming to the area, how family life occurred on a rural tobacco farm, and the vernacular history past down from generation to generation in the area.
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Record #:
21743
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The report of Luther Terry, Surgeon-General of the United States, and his committee--titled Smoking and Health--was released to reporters on January 11, 1964. The meeting was in a sealed room at the State Department with guards at the doors. The essence of this report was that smoking was \"a health hazard of such importance to the United States to warrant immediate action.\" Although politicians and farmers in North Carolina denied it, it marked the beginning of the end for the state's money crop. In 1964 there were 87,576 tobacco farmers in the state and in 2007 there were 2,622.
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Record #:
24108
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A coalition of groups launched an ambitious undertaking to codify tobacco barns in Madison County, recording the architecture and objects left behind in the barns.
Record #:
24460
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North Carolina’s tobacco heritage is preserved at the Tobacco Farm Life Museum in Kenly. It provides a monument to one of North Carolina’s most important industries.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 1, June 1991, p32-34, il
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Record #:
24485
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This article presents the history of cigarettes, tobacco, and smoking in North Carolina, as well as presenting a number of historic advertisements for cigarettes.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 9, February 1978, p10-15, il
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Record #:
24543
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This article discusses the Living Tobacco Museum and how it will preserve North Carolina’s tobacco industry and heritage. It is located at the Duke Homestead State Historic Site in Durham.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 11, April 1976, p19-21, il, por
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Record #:
16103
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Tobacco constitutes an important crop in the state's history, and one particular family made their fortunes on this plant. Washington Duke began growing tobacco after the Civil War and his grandson, James Buchanan Duke, would create a successful family business called the American Tobacco Company.
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Record #:
23348
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Previously in eastern North Carolina, July until late August has been a busy time for the tobacco farmer when the annual tobacco season came to a head. This activity was the center of life for tobacco farmers, as the barn would become a gathering place. By the 1980s this way of life had disappeared from the farms and with it a ritual in the life of the farmer. Times and technology changed the way of life into a new industry, which itself became derelict.
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Record #:
30744
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One student’s perspective working as a living history tour guide at the Duke Homestead State Historic Site. The homestead site, in Durham, NC is the tobacco plantation that contains a tobacco history museum and the Duke family farmhouse built in 1852.
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Record #:
30992
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Two new books by historian and third-generation tobacco grower, Billy Yeargin, recall North Carolina’s rich tobacco heritage through photographs, residents’ recollections and geographical research. In “North Carolina Tobacco: A History,” Yeargin explores the influence of tobacco on the state’s history, describing when communities were founded and built upon tobacco culture.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 9, Sept 2008, p26-27, il, por
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Record #:
35492
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The admiration of this herb, as noted by the local Indians who consumed it, was defined by its believed ability to cure more than two hundred diseases. The irony was not lost on the author: products made from this “excellent herbe” are more likely to cause death than preserve life.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1976, p31-33, 36