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25 results for Oysters
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Record #:
26910
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Ocracoke Island residents harvested oysters long before Sir Walter Raleigh’s agents discovered the island. Following the Civil War, however, Ocracokers harvested increasing numbers of the shellfish and nurtured their beds to ensure that there would be plenty of oysters for generations. In 1890, tensions grew between native Ocracokers and outsiders whose dredging practices had virtually destroyed their oyster populations. Eventually, the state passed to protect Ocracoke’s oyster beds from over-fishing.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 12, May 2016, p30, 32, 34, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
3916
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A hundred years ago the state's oystermen annually harvested over 2.5 million bushels. However, overharvesting by dredging, lack of fishing law enforcement, pollution, coastal development, and, since 1989, a naturally occurring oyster disease have all but destroyed the industry. Today about 40,000 bushels are harvested yearly.
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Record #:
27334
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The NC Sea Grant program is using story maps to explain oyster aquaculture and oyster reef restoration due to building interest across the state. The article explains the benefits of protecting oysters and encouraging their habitat for the health of the state’s ecosystem and the potential economic benefit of harvesting oysters.
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Record #:
27629
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Phil Gagnon, a resident of Emerald Isle and oyster harvester, discusses his oyster garden and encourages others to raise oysters as well.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2016, p24-26, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22589
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North Carolina oysters are a keystone species for the health of the state's estuaries. Since 2003, a diverse group of stakeholders has worked to develop initiatives related to the protection and restoration of the state's oyster populations.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2015, p18-19, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28791
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The boring sponge is narrowing the regions that are open to shellfish harvests free of the infestation. The boring sponge has a major effect on oyster populations and pose an economic problem to oyster farmers. The author discusses a study he created to test how oysters were affected by the substrate on which the oysters grow. The results of the study and the problem are detailed.
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Record #:
30692
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Oyster roasts are an eastern North Carolina tradition during the winter. In this article, the author discusses traditions in Plymouth, North Carolina, the process of roasting oysters, and family oyster recipes.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 46 Issue 12, Dec 2014, p16, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
31544
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Celebrate the south’s bivalve renaissance at one of these new oyster bars. This article features two North Carolina restaurants, Sea Level in Charlotte and The Kathrine Brasserie and Bar in Winston-Salem.
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Record #:
31674
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Rose Bay Oyster House is one of about twenty shucking houses in North Carolina, and the only one in the state that has its own oyster beds. Henderson Miles, a manager of the Rose Bay company, discusses oyster harvesting and some of the problems facing the oyster industry. According to Jim Brown of the Division of Commercial and Sports Fisheries, some of the problems are pollution and the lack of substrate for oysters to live.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 6 Issue 8, Aug 1974, p20-21, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
36263
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UNC system research and startup businesses generated over 2.6 billion dollars and created over 28,000 jobs. Also yielded were medical advancements such as gene therapy, businesses like GI Therapeutics, Inc., and protective measures of the state’s ecosystems aimed to improve oyster growth.