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7 results for Hispanic Americans--Health and hygiene
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Record #:
3697
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Florence Siman Zablah of Siler City received an INDEPENDENT 1997 Citizen Award for creating the Latino Program at Child Care Network in Chatham County. It makes Latinos aware of the state's health and safety practices and helps state agencies structure programs for them.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 15 Issue 48, Nov 1997, p13-14, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4293
Author(s):
Abstract:
How well Hispanics are able to access health care services is influenced by a number of factors. Inability to communicate in English limits knowledge of services and ability to communicate health needs. Many lack health insurance or other ways to pay for services. Others lack means of transportation, either personal or public, or are unfamiliar with how the health care system operates in America.
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Record #:
4291
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Community outreach programs seek to ensure that Hispanics have access to the same quality of health services that the rest of the community has. Outreach programs include providing interpreters at health facilities, providing health literature in Spanish, providing transportation to and from clinics, and visiting migrant farm camps.
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Record #:
4292
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Vital health issues among Hispanics vary by gender and by age group. Access to health care and inadequate or no health insurance are common to all, and are affected by low income and lack of transportation. Prenatal care is significant to women, while job injuries are important to men. Among children, immunization and nutrition rank high.
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Record #:
4505
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With almost 14 percent of the nation's population speaking a language other than English, overcoming language barriers is critical to health care. There are almost 300,000 Spanish speakers in North Carolina, along with a growing list of other nationalities. Perkins discusses the need for translation services during health care visits, factors that inhibit appropriate language access, and laws governing linguistic access to health care.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 65 Issue 1, Fall 1999, p38-44, il, f
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Record #:
5771
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Abstract:
Despite poverty and other barriers to health care, first-generation Latinas have the healthiest babies in North Carolina, with fewer low birthweight and pre-term babies. Solow discusses reasons for this.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 20 Issue 4, Jan 2003, p22-27, 29, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6802
Author(s):
Abstract:
This study seeks \"to provide data on key health indicators for the state's Hispanic Spanish-speaking population, and to compare those results with those of English-speaking Hispanics and non-Hispanic African Americans and whites.\" The study concluded that \"the elevated risks of fair/poor health, lack of adequate nutrition, low level of leisure-time physical activity, and lack of health insurance among Spanish-speaking Hispanics in North Carolina call for public health action to remedy the negative health outcomes.\"
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 143, July 2004, p1-8, il, bibl