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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Health services accessibility
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Record #:
4293
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Abstract:
How well Hispanics are able to access health care services is influenced by a number of factors. Inability to communicate in English limits knowledge of services and ability to communicate health needs. Many lack health insurance or other ways to pay for services. Others lack means of transportation, either personal or public, or are unfamiliar with how the health care system operates in America.
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Record #:
4291
Author(s):
Abstract:
Community outreach programs seek to ensure that Hispanics have access to the same quality of health services that the rest of the community has. Outreach programs include providing interpreters at health facilities, providing health literature in Spanish, providing transportation to and from clinics, and visiting migrant farm camps.
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Record #:
4505
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With almost 14 percent of the nation's population speaking a language other than English, overcoming language barriers is critical to health care. There are almost 300,000 Spanish speakers in North Carolina, along with a growing list of other nationalities. Perkins discusses the need for translation services during health care visits, factors that inhibit appropriate language access, and laws governing linguistic access to health care.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 65 Issue 1, Fall 1999, p38-44, il, f
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Record #:
30033
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In return for over a $135,000 in investments, the North Carolina State Laboratory of Hygiene provides services and materials to the people of the state. These services, including vaccines, are valued at over $3,000,000.
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Record #:
33198
Author(s):
Abstract:
In order to get proper healthcare to rural and isolated communities, the NC State Board of Health and the US Public Health Services have teamed up to create a mobile clinic comprised of a doctor, nurse and driver. The US Public Health Service will provide the truck that will be the basis for the clinic with the assurance that North Carolina will keep the program going for a minimum of 3 years.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 11, Aug 1938, p7
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