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7 results for Scharer, Joanne
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Record #:
4290
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Abstract:
Hispanics are attracted to North Carolina by a moderate climate, job opportunities, and low cost of living. There are approximately 230,000 living in the state. The once stereotypical image of Hispanic-as-migrant no longer is applicable, as many now work in construction, food service, and factories, as well as higher paying jobs, including engineering, medicine, and law. A statistical profile of the 1997 Hispanic population by counties is included.
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Record #:
4293
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How well Hispanics are able to access health care services is influenced by a number of factors. Inability to communicate in English limits knowledge of services and ability to communicate health needs. Many lack health insurance or other ways to pay for services. Others lack means of transportation, either personal or public, or are unfamiliar with how the health care system operates in America.
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Record #:
4291
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Community outreach programs seek to ensure that Hispanics have access to the same quality of health services that the rest of the community has. Outreach programs include providing interpreters at health facilities, providing health literature in Spanish, providing transportation to and from clinics, and visiting migrant farm camps.
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Record #:
4292
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Vital health issues among Hispanics vary by gender and by age group. Access to health care and inadequate or no health insurance are common to all, and are affected by low income and lack of transportation. Prenatal care is significant to women, while job injuries are important to men. Among children, immunization and nutrition rank high.
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Record #:
5251
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How strong is the public's support for its schools? To answer this question, the North Carolina Center for Public Policy Research examined data on enrollment trends, polling data, and local bond votes from 1990-1991 through 2000-2001. The Center concluded that while the public is not completely satisfied with its schools, the support for them remains strong, as evinced by rising enrollment, increased public opinion poll support, and passages of bond issues for school construction.
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Record #:
6766
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Between North Carolina's white population and a growing minority population, disparities persist in many areas. These include education, economic well-being, housing, voter participation, Internet access, health status, and criminal justice. Scharer examines each of these areas; asks what can and should the government of North Carolina do about disparities; and then makes recommendations to close the racial/ethnic gap.
Source:
North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 21 Issue 1-2, June 2004, p16-33, 35-48,51-74, il, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
4829
Abstract:
Since 1983, public schools in North Carolina have experienced ten major reform efforts. These include the 1985 Basic Education Program, the Year-Round School Movement in 1989, the 1996 Charter School Legislation, and the 1996 ABC Plan. Critics say the state tries too many new programs and does not allow any of them enough time for proper evaluation. Williams and Scharer discuss each of the ten programs in detail.
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North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 19 Issue 1/2, Oct 2000, p58-65, 68-107, il, f Periodical Website
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