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14 results for Food banks
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Record #:
23997
Abstract:
Cindy Threlkeld is the executive director of MANNA FoodBank; she discusses the challenges she faces in her position and how she ended up in Asheville.
Record #:
24016
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John Stack, director of FATE (Funding American through Entertainment), an Asheville-based non-profit organization, seeks to bring attention to various hunger-related issues while generating revenues to address them.
Record #:
25666
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In 2009, UNC professor Maureen Berner, East Carolina University political scientist Sharon Paynter, and photojournalist Donn Young documented the work of nonprofits and volunteers who help feed the working poor. The Raleigh food bank established temporary food-assistance agencies that never closed due to increasing demand for food. A more practical approach might be to provide refrigerators and other resources to food banks and pantries.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 26 Issue 2, Winter 2010, p6-15, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27161
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The search for an alternative site for FoodFirst, a new three-story building proposed by the Inter-Faith Council for Social Service to replace its existing pantry, is the subject of intense debate in downtown Carrboro. IFC director Michael Reinke says the situation is about feeding hungry people, and not about the homeless.
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Record #:
28528
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The Farmers and Communities Manage Deer program encourages licensed hunters to harvest white-tailed deer and donate them to drop-off sites and participating facilities. The processed meat is then used to feed impoverished people in need. The program, its success feeding the poor in Eastern North Carolina, and its impact on the deer population are detailed.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 48 Issue 11, November 2016, p14
Record #:
30727
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North Carolina has one of the country’s worst problems with hunger, especially among the state’s children. To fight childhood hunger, the North Carolina Pork Council and the North Carolina Association of Feeding America Food Banks have launched a multi-pronged campaign called The Food Effect. The campaign is a social network designed to educate, involve and unite citizens in supporting food banks.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 43 Issue 11, Nov 2011, p12-13, por
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Record #:
35326
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Hannah Miller related how one beach visitor was inspired to put groceries his fellow vacationers left behind to good use: to benefit those in need of food.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 47 Issue 8, August 2015, p14
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Record #:
34975
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After a career in the NFL as center for the St. Louis Rams, Jason Brown decided to settle back down in Louisburg, North Carolina and set up his farm. Since 2012, he has produced thousands of pounds of sweet potatoes and donated them to the Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina for food pantries and after-school programs.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 6, November 2017, p144-152, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
36572
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A nonprofit started by Ali Casparian in 2012 sought to do more than offer provisions for those experiencing food insecurity; she sought to help individuals have a healthier, sustainable way of life. Through the support of organizations such as MANNA Foodbank, Swannanoa Community Garden, and New Sprout Organic Farms, the dream has become a reality that has gone beyond her vision. The reality turned into three weekly market locations, a daycare center, senior housing center, provided for senior citizens and low-income families in Buncombe County.
Record #:
36566
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Offering haven is a nonprofit currently housing 58 wolfdogs coming from animal control agencies, closed breeding facilities, and separation from owners because of divorce or death. Opened in 2002, it offers education and outreach for wolfdogs through the support of a fully- volunteer staff, donors, and programs such as MANNA Foodbank and Carolina Bison.
Record #:
36551
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At this nonprofit organization, those otherwise classified as living on the fringes of society can find themselves treated as part of the community. Services offered by BeLoved to help generate this perception include assistance with completing job applications; transitional housing for vulnerable populations; food access; children’s enrichment programs; supporting the Rise Up Studio artists collective; and collaborating in homeless rights projects and campaigns.
Record #:
36482
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For individuals with terminal illnesses, life can be complicated further by having to choose between buying medications and other needs. Helping individuals living with HIV/AIDS is a food pantry that provides more than a way to not choose between medications and groceries. In fact, this food pantry provides more than the household items also on the shelves. Partnering with local hospices, food banks, and nonprofits, Loving Food Resources helps to improve the quality of life remaining for individuals from 16 of the 17 Western North Carolina counties.
Record #:
36081
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Among ECU’s accomplishments can be added Aramark and the Volunteer and Service Learning Center’s collaborative creation of Campus Kitchen. It was the first among institutions in the UNC system. As for other ECU students’ food-related endeavors, mentioned was their packing of care packages for military members serving overseas.
Record #:
39762
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MANNA FoodBank services over a dozen North Carolina counties, distributes food to over 200 organizations, and feeds more than 100,000 people each year. Making this non-profit’s vast difference possible include volunteers from The Community Table in Sylva and food from donors such as Henderson County’s Flavor 1st Growers and Packers.