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11 results for Dove hunting
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Record #:
25958
Author(s):
Abstract:
Opening on Labor Day, North Carolina hunters can take their aim at doves in a split season: September to October and December to January. Hunters must also abide by bag limits and times of day specific to the bird.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 18 Issue 3, Summer 1974, p18
Subject(s):
Record #:
26500
Author(s):
Abstract:
The split mourning dove season will run from September to October, and again from December to January. The first portion of the season, hunting hours will happen at noon while the second half will occur from sunrise to sunset.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 9, Sept 1980, p5, 16
Subject(s):
Record #:
26522
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the opening of the North Carolina mourning dove hunting season, hunters are required to understand Federal dove baiting regulations such as the planting and harvesting of crops to attract doves.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 10, Oct 1980, p12
Subject(s):
Record #:
26639
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dove hunting is an excellent way to polish a retriever’s skills for the duck season. In North Carolina, it is important to consider heat and hydration. Heat and humidity can cause a dog to overheat, and also create conditions that are not conducive to winding scent.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 34 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1987, p4-5, il, por
Record #:
26661
Author(s):
Abstract:
The mourning dove is the most hunted and the most harvested migratory game bird in North America. A primary problem in dove hunting, particularly in southeastern states, is baiting and confusion over what constitutes a baited area. Hunters are advised to review the regulations and check the field for bait before hunting.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 33 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1986, p3-4, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
26944
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hunting seasons for doves and several other migratory birds were set at a meeting of the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission on July 26. In other action, two new Wildlife Commissioners were sworn in, no-wake zones were adopted in Catawba and Davidson counties, and regulations were adopted prohibiting the shining of lights in deer areas at night.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 9, Sept/Oct 1982, p7
Record #:
26783
Author(s):
Abstract:
The mourning dove, a popular upland game bird, migrates to North Carolina each fall. The dove’s small size and flight antics make it a difficult target for hunters to consistently hit. Hunters have found a variety of strategies to outwit the dove, cherished for its dark, tender meat.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 30 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1983, p10, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
26850
Author(s):
Abstract:
This year’s dove season in North Carolina will be split into two half-seasons, with dove hunting opening on September 5. The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission also established new regulations for migratory birds and boating, and are considering proposed regulations for bass fishing.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 9, Sept 1981, p9-12, il
Record #:
29615
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has twenty-four public game lands planted with various crops to attract mourning doves and to benefit other wildlife. Christopher Jordan, a game lands and forest resources manager, offers his advice on the best places to dove hunt.
Source:
Record #:
37835
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dove hunting is a major sport in the southeastern states, and there is much discourse over the regulations set forth by the Fish and Wildlife Service, such as opening dates, season length, and management techniques.
Record #:
38320
Author(s):
Abstract:
Surveying 22 dove hunters on opening day of hunting season, the average cost per dove is about $0.57. The ratings of shooters varied from ‘expert’ to ‘optimistic,’ with the latter being multiple shells fired with zero kills.
Subject(s):