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17 results for Actors
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Record #:
2426
Author(s):
Abstract:
For one thespian, \"Horn in the West,\" the third-oldest outdoor play in the country, has become a lifetime summer activity. Glenn Causey, now in his fortieth season of playing Daniel Boone in the drama, has performed the roll over 2,000 times.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 3, Aug 1995, p39, por
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Record #:
14436
Author(s):
Abstract:
Robert Carroll, a young actor and pianist, has joined the ranks of a number of other North Carolinians who have made good recently in the theatrical world.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 26, Nov 1947, p3, 30, f
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Record #:
14683
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sidney Blackmer -- the kid from Salisbury, North Carolina -- went on to make a name for himself in the bright and glittering world that is the theater. His name was the first among Tar Heel sons and daughters on the stage, screen, and in radio to have attached to it the coveted word \"star.\"
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 14, Sept 1944, p1-2, 26, f
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Record #:
15208
Author(s):
Abstract:
Richard Bond, born William Clement Haentzschel, was among the important players in 20th Century-Fox's new release, \"Boy Friend.\" Bond was born in Conover, North Carolina and made his way to California as a screen actor. \"Boy Friend\" is his most promising role yet.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 9, July 1939, p3, 20, f
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Record #:
15314
Abstract:
Twelve-year-old Tommie Baker became a sensation in the mid-1930s. Tommie Baker left his home in Rocky Mount to go to New York City to receive additional training in song and dance. Some of his early accolades included auditioning for MGM, RKO, and Warner Brothers as well as danced at the Cotton Club.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 5, July 1937, p7, 16, por
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Record #:
15338
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sidney Blackmer was a Salisbury native before moving to Hollywood where he pursued an acting career. His path to acting was difficult and did not begin until after a year in law school at the University of North Carolina, which he could not afford tuition for more than a year. After being recruited during World War I, he returned to theater where he worked his way up from stage hand to cast member. His most acclaimed work came from his portrayal of President Theodore Roosevelt in seven different movies.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 26, Nov 1937, p1, 18, por
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Record #:
15500
Abstract:
The development of the dramatic arts in North Carolina has been quite interesting. Beginning with the Gifford Strolling Players as early as 1780s, North Carolina has been the home to many actors and movie stars. In 1793 New Bern vied for theatrical preeminence with the first theatrical performance given by pupils of the North Carolina school. Theatrical excellence continued in men such as John Augustin Daly, noted playwright and produce, born in Plymouth, and William Churchill DeMille, playwright, born in Washington.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 41, Mar 1936, p16, 30
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Record #:
15503
Author(s):
Abstract:
Shepperd Strudwick, Jr., native of Hillsboro, is one of the most talented young actors currently on Broadway. He is now appearing in a comedy hit, \"End of Summer,\" for the Theatre Guild.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 43, Mar 1936, p3, 22, 24, f
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Record #:
17648
Abstract:
An article in the July 3, 1937 issue of THE STATE told how Billy Burke discovered Tommie in Nash County, invested his own money to see he got proper training in song and dance in New York, and the sensation he created there. This article follows up on Tommie's progress in Hollywood and the reaction to his first movie--\"Kid actor in his debut steals show.\"
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 32, Jan 1940, p1, 18, por
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Record #:
23431
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Abstract:
Thomas Hezekiah Mix was born in Cameron County, PA, in 1880. It was not until 1904 that he headed west to try his hand as a cowboy. At the St. Louis World Fair, Mix met Will Rogers and they would remain friends for life. Mix had dedicated himself to fine-tuning his rodeo skills. In 1910, he began his movie career when he was hired along with Hoot Gibson to appear in a western. Mix would go on to appear in between 300 and 400 films and to become the first actor to promote his horse as a star. Tom Mix was a \"straight-shooting, non-drinking, non-smoking, non-swearing\" cowboy who set an example for children and adult Wild West fans. Tom Mix came to Greenville on December 1, 1933, and on October 8, 1936. He died in an automobile accident in 1940 at the age of sixty.
Record #:
23435
Author(s):
Abstract:
Will Rogers (1879 - 1935), the cowboy humorist, came to Greenville on April 6, 1926, and gave two performances to 5,000 fans. Rogers was born on a cattle ranch in Oklahoma. He later joined a Wild West show as a trick roper and entered the Guinness Book of World Records for throwing three lassos at once. Rogers toured the world, wrote a syndicated news column and six books, appeared in 50 silent films and 21 talking movies, and was a popular radio personality. He died at the age of 55 when his plane crashed in Alaska.
Record #:
27771
Author(s):
Abstract:
Andy Griffith passed away at his Roanoke Island home on Tuesday. Members of North Carolina’s arts community share their thoughts about the actor. Allan Gurganus, Clyde Edgerton, Eddie Huffman, George Holt, Mike Dillon, and Art Menius share their thoughts on Griffith’s character, talent, and impact on the state of North Carolina.
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Record #:
28109
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Abstract:
The Southern Documentary Fund of Durham encourages documentary media projects made within or about the American South. The group serves to help fundraising to support documentary projects and is celebrating its five year anniversary. The group is looking to expand by creating a network for documentary artists to access production resources and distribute their films. Also in the article on film are updates of the Full Frame Documentary Festival and the death of actor Heath Ledger.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 5, January 2008, p47 Periodical Website
Record #:
23017
Author(s):
Abstract:
Kammerer gives a small compendium of the known films about or made in Pitt County and several local actors. The first known film was a silent romance movie from 1918 entitled “Stroke of Twelve,” filmed entirely in Greenville. In 1925, there was a movie made of Greenville entitled “Who’s Who in Greenville.” In 1927 there was a movie made of the Greenville Tobacco market and in 1941, there was another movie entitled “Greenville On The Screen.” In 1947, there was a locally made film, “Pitch A Boogie Woogie” with an all-black cast and in 1966, Pitt County was the backdrop for several “B” movies. There were two local movie stars, Lath Morris and Kathryn Youngblood, who starred in several films.
Record #:
23372
Author(s):
Abstract:
Born in Tekamah, NE, Edmund Richard Gibson learned how to ride a horse at a young age. Because of his interest in hunting owls, he was nicknamed "Hoot." He joined the circus at age thirteen and was stranded in Colorado. He worked as a cowpuncher until 1910, when a film director hired him for a short silent film. He competed in rodeos while he appeared in two other films. In 1912 he won the World’s All-Around Champion Cowboy award. He then began to appear as a stunt double for such stars as Harry Carey. He did a short stint in the Army during WWI but returned in 1919 to become a major western movie star. He went on to appear in more westerns than any other Hollywood movie star and received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Hoot Gibson came to Greenville on October 3, 1937, with the Hagenbeck-Wallace railroad circus. He died of cancer in 1965.