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Record #:
349
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The history of outdoor dramas in North Carolina begins with \"The Lost Colony\" in 1937 and includes the productions of \"Unto These Hills,\" a Cherokee drama, and \"From This Day Forward,\" a drama depicting the Waldensians, a group of French- Italian Protestants who immigrated to America in 1893.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 5 Issue 4, Feb 1983, p15-21, il, por, f
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Record #:
2426
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For one thespian, \"Horn in the West,\" the third-oldest outdoor play in the country, has become a lifetime summer activity. Glenn Causey, now in his fortieth season of playing Daniel Boone in the drama, has performed the roll over 2,000 times.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 3, Aug 1995, p39, por
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Record #:
8874
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The South has a rich legacy of playwrights. When Gary Cole moved from Portland, Oregon to Raleigh, he realized that North Carolina did not have a festival that highlighted Southern playwrights. Having been an active member of the theatre community in Portland, he set out to see what he could do. Sauls discusses how a mixture of one fan of Southern playwrights with a magical old theatre in Wilson's Edna Boykin Cultural Center and a supportive local community resulted in the Theatre of the American South Festival. The festival debuted in May 2006.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p146-148, 150, 152-153, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
11635
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Seay discusses the influence Frederick Koch had on the dramatic arts in North Carolina in the early part of the 20th-century. While a professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Koch founded the Carolina Playmakers, one of the most influential repertoire groups of its time.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 6, July 1934, p9, por
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Record #:
27949
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PlayMakers Repertory Company artistic director Joesph Haj discusses his philosophy of work and his latest plays with the company. A biography of Haj is also provided. American Theatre magazine recently named Haj among the 25 theater artists likely to shape American theater for the next 25 years. Haj’s most recent success and his challenges directing Hamlet are highlighted.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 21, May 2010, p30-31 Periodical Website
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Record #:
28039
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“The Theme is Blackness” Festival was recently curated by Duke’s Theater Studies faculty. The event is a way to encourage diversity in theater. The number of minority students who participate in Duke’s Theater programs is approximately 10 percent and the department has not had any black directors of plays over the last 15 years. This year, the festival premiered a play produced by a black director and used a NC Arts Council grant to foster black stage designers. The festivals plays are intended to celebrate blackness and push audiences to consider issues of race.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 45, November 2010, p18 Periodical Website
Record #:
28059
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At the University of North Carolina, the Process Series helps creators develop new works. Directed by Joseph Megel, the series helps artists performing new works on stage. The series helps mentor and critique the works, offering feedback to the artists. All six works that received help from the series and Megel will be performed in North Carolina.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 26 Issue 44, November 2009, p24-25 Periodical Website
Record #:
28858
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The outdoor drama, The Lost Colony, has been running in North Carolina since 1937. The Lost Colony blends music, dance, drama and history to commemorate important events. The drama is performed outdoors to depict a realistic experience close to history.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 1 Issue 4, June 1985, p6-7, por
Record #:
30745
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North Carolina has thirteen outdoor theaters, more than any of the other states with outdoor dramas. The art form began in 1937 with the production of The Lost Colony in Manteo, and most of the outdoor dramas are historical dramatizations of North Carolina’s heritage or traditional theater classics. This article provides a list of 2010 summer productions and descriptions of each.
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Record #:
32214
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Three historical outdoor dramas are presented in North Carolina every summer. The oldest of North Carolina’s outdoor dramas is “The Lost Colony,” which portrays the events leading to the colony’s disappearance. The drama “Horn in the West” tells the story of Daniel Boone, and “Unto These Hills” portrays the struggle of the Cherokee Indians to live in peace in their own native land.
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Record #:
36176
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How to boost holistic success for Cumberland County a decade down the road had been planned by groups such as Fayetteville’s Economic Development Alliance. Planned was development and improvement of the Cape Fear Botanical Garden, Airborne and Special Operations Museum, historic downtown center, Arts Council, minor league baseball stadium, Civil War History Center, and Performing Arts Center.
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Record #:
36184
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Places in the Heart recently joined the Magnolia Arts Center, Smiles and Frowns Playhouse, Whirligig Stage, and Farmville Community Arts Council as the theatrical presence in the community. An associate of Magnolia Theatre she is “cautiously optimistic” though about establishing dramatic arts options comparable to the long established sporting offerings.
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