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Record #:
23431
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thomas Hezekiah Mix was born in Cameron County, PA, in 1880. It was not until 1904 that he headed west to try his hand as a cowboy. At the St. Louis World Fair, Mix met Will Rogers and they would remain friends for life. Mix had dedicated himself to fine-tuning his rodeo skills. In 1910, he began his movie career when he was hired along with Hoot Gibson to appear in a western. Mix would go on to appear in between 300 and 400 films and to become the first actor to promote his horse as a star. Tom Mix was a \"straight-shooting, non-drinking, non-smoking, non-swearing\" cowboy who set an example for children and adult Wild West fans. Tom Mix came to Greenville on December 1, 1933, and on October 8, 1936. He died in an automobile accident in 1940 at the age of sixty.
Record #:
23435
Author(s):
Abstract:
Will Rogers (1879 - 1935), the cowboy humorist, came to Greenville on April 6, 1926, and gave two performances to 5,000 fans. Rogers was born on a cattle ranch in Oklahoma. He later joined a Wild West show as a trick roper and entered the Guinness Book of World Records for throwing three lassos at once. Rogers toured the world, wrote a syndicated news column and six books, appeared in 50 silent films and 21 talking movies, and was a popular radio personality. He died at the age of 55 when his plane crashed in Alaska.
Record #:
23372
Author(s):
Abstract:
Born in Tekamah, NE, Edmund Richard Gibson learned how to ride a horse at a young age. Because of his interest in hunting owls, he was nicknamed "Hoot." He joined the circus at age thirteen and was stranded in Colorado. He worked as a cowpuncher until 1910, when a film director hired him for a short silent film. He competed in rodeos while he appeared in two other films. In 1912 he won the World’s All-Around Champion Cowboy award. He then began to appear as a stunt double for such stars as Harry Carey. He did a short stint in the Army during WWI but returned in 1919 to become a major western movie star. He went on to appear in more westerns than any other Hollywood movie star and received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Hoot Gibson came to Greenville on October 3, 1937, with the Hagenbeck-Wallace railroad circus. He died of cancer in 1965.
Record #:
35418
Abstract:
The title suggests that days of playing the Lone Ranger were special ones from Jack Burris’ childhood. Look beyond the title, though, and it’s revealed that Sundays also played a significant role in days gone by. As for the role of the Sabbath day in Williams’ recollection, a photo taken in 1895 proved the day important because of the one day a week attire of those featured.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 48 Issue 6, June 2016, p28