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42 results for "Tobacco industry"
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Record #:
13362
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The P. Lorillard Company began construction on a $13 million dollar tobacco plant set to be the largest one-story factory of its kind in the world. Encompassing 12 acres, Lorillard's new plant is the largest construction project attempted in the state as well as the biggest expansion the company has undertaken in 25 years.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 25, May 1955, p9-10, 27, il
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Record #:
13623
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The threat of a price ceiling, which might have greatly impaired one of North Carolina's most picturesque and important enterprises, tobacco, has been removed for the moment.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 14, Sept 1951, p3-6, 19, map, f
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Record #:
13748
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K.M. Biggs, Incorporated, in Robeson County this year becomes the largest grower of tobacco in North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 37, Feb 1952, p6, 24, f
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Record #:
13830
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In 1952, the Taylor Brothers Tobacco Company of Winston-Salem was sold to the American Snuff Company. This sale marks the end of small, independent tobacco manufacturers in the state.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 32, Jan 1953, p1-2, 19, por
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Record #:
14705
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After months of hard work, tobacco farmers of North Carolina are now cashing in on their labor. The crop this year is above the average with respect to size and quality.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 15, Sept 1944, p6-7, f
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Record #:
15485
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Indigenous tobacco plants satisfied early settlers' appetites but in 1852 the first \"bright leaf\" tobacco was grown and started the state's tobacco boom. The popularity of J. L. Green's tobacco with Civil War soldiers created the world-famous \"Bull Durham\" brand. The Duke's became prolific tobacco farmers and the \"Duke's Mixture\" helped J. B. Duke form the American Tobacco Company. The tobacco industry was not limited to the 'Triangle' and places like Winston-Salem became cigarette manufacturing locales.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 17, Sept 1935, p7, 19, il
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Record #:
15785
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A report released in September 2011 by Oxfam American and the Farm Labor Organizing Committee details the human rights abuses in North Carolina's tobacco industry while unveiling detailed claims of exploitation and mistreatment of undocumented workers in tobacco fields throughout the state.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 45, Sept 2011, p7, 9, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
16936
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Beacham provides background on tobacco dependency in North Carolina, stressing the importance of defining dependence in a broad way as they pursue policy options and community development projects.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 10 Issue , 2002, p23-28, map, f
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Record #:
16940
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Estes discusses the alternatives to tobacco farming for North Carolina farmers considering the growing changes to the tobacco industry.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 10 Issue , 2002, p42-48
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Record #:
21318
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Between 1899 and 1904, Durham native Edward James Parrish lived in Japan as a representative for James B. Duke's American Tobacco Company. Parrish worked closely with the Murai Brothers Company Ltd., to improve production, financing, and marketing techniques for the tobacco company. In 1904, the Japanese Diet introduced and passed legislation that began government ownership of all tobacco manufacturing, Parrish was influential in the company receiving a good settlement with the government.
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Record #:
24485
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This article presents the history of cigarettes, tobacco, and smoking in North Carolina, as well as presenting a number of historic advertisements for cigarettes.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 9, February 1978, p10-15, il
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Record #:
24605
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In January 1964, the Surgeon General explained the findings of a recent study—that cigarette smoking was linked to lung cancer and heart disease. Since that time, the tobacco industry has received a number of blows, including the end of the quota system in 2004. Some North Carolina tobacco farmers continue to grow tobacco, but many discontinued harvesting the crop and instead turned to farming other products, such as berries and grapes.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 4, September 2014, p166-168, 170, 172, 174, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24691
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The P. Lorillard Co. plant, which manufactures tobacco, will open at a new location in Greensboro. Because of this expansion, North Carolina will have four of the six largest cigarette manufacturing companies within its boundaries.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 25, May 1955, p9-10, 27, il
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Record #:
25601
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Located in Tobaccoville, a new R.J. Reynolds $800 million dollar plant is currently under construction. The new plant will cover 26 acres of land, employ 2,000 construction workers, have a cafeteria and medical facility, and produce 120 billion cigarettes a year. The Tobaccoville plant is part of a billion dollar, 10-year expansion program for Reynolds Tobacco, which employs more than 12,000 workers in Winston-Salem.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 2 Issue 24, Dec. 21-Jan 17 1984, p4-5, por Periodical Website
Record #:
28575
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In Winston-Salem, North Carolina, Reynolds American Inc. agreed to be sold to British American Tobacco PLC for $49 billion. Under Susan Cameron, former CEO and current executive chairman of Reynolds, the company transformed tobacco and became a leader in products that are reduced risk.
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