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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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12 results for "Tobacco farmers"
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Record #:
28505
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Abstract:
Supervising, tending, and harvesting the tobacco crop was a non-traditional role for African-American women in the 1960s. Mildred Keaton recounts how her mother and many black women she knew managed small tobacco farms as their husbands worked full-time jobs in Bladen and Columbus counties. Keaton and Estella Graham’s stories highlight the many roles African-American women played in tobacco farming, from planting to hauling the cured leaves to market.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 48 Issue 8, August 2016, p6
Record #:
24605
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In January 1964, the Surgeon General explained the findings of a recent study—that cigarette smoking was linked to lung cancer and heart disease. Since that time, the tobacco industry has received a number of blows, including the end of the quota system in 2004. Some North Carolina tobacco farmers continue to grow tobacco, but many discontinued harvesting the crop and instead turned to farming other products, such as berries and grapes.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 4, September 2014, p166-168, 170, 172, 174, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
30992
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Two new books by historian and third-generation tobacco grower, Billy Yeargin, recall North Carolina’s rich tobacco heritage through photographs, residents’ recollections and geographical research. In “North Carolina Tobacco: A History,” Yeargin explores the influence of tobacco on the state’s history, describing when communities were founded and built upon tobacco culture.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 9, Sept 2008, p26-27, il, por
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Record #:
7449
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In 2004, approximately 7,800 tobacco farmers raised $588 million of tobacco on 151,000 acres. Martin provides a season-by-season look at North Carolina's most labor-intensive crop.
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Record #:
31190
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The North Carolina Rural Economic Development Center in Asheville, North Carolina is the nation’s first “marketing center,” returning to the traditional tobacco warehouse auction system. In addition to allowing the auction, the center’s project also pays warehouse, grading and assessment fees, and other marketing fees typically paid by growers.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 34 Issue 2, Feb 2002, p22-23, por
Record #:
31225
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Abstract:
North Carolina’s beaches and sand dunes are vulnerable to erosion, and therefore depend on sea oats and beach grass for stabilization. David Nash, a doctoral candidate at North Carolina State University, is growing sea oats that may not only help stabilize sand dunes, but also offer farmers an alternative crop. Nash applied tobacco germination techniques to develop a float system for cultivating local sea oat seeds.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 33 Issue 6, June 2001, p16-17, por
Record #:
25743
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Abstract:
A new North Carolina government report states that the state’s agriculturale industry cannot continue to depend on tobacco. The report, issued by a governor’s advisory panel, declares that either the market is going to squeeze out tobacco farmers or Congress will eliminate their protection.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 5 Issue 4, Feb 26-March 11 1987, p12-13, por Periodical Website
Record #:
15839
Abstract:
In fear over the future of the federal tobacco program, tobacco farmers are looking for alternatives, such as fruit and vegetables, to tobacco. The primary problem in switching is marketing. Only tobacco offers the safety of a guaranteed market.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Summer 1982, p27
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Record #:
9056
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Johnston County native, Pamela Barefoot, recently published a book entitled “Mules and Memories, a Photo Documentary of the Tobacco Farmer.” Upon quitting her counseling job in Richmond, Virginia, Barefoot, who came from a family of tobacco farmers, spent the next eighteen months compiling photos for the book. In 1972, she graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University, but photography was merely as a hobby at that time.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 11, Apr 1979, p15-17, il, por
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Record #:
31543
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Tobacco is still America’s largest cash crop that is most dependent on manual labor, mules, plows and pegs. Of all tobaccos, Bright Leaf has been most receptive to mechanization. This article discusses the heritage of tobacco farming in Caswell County, and how farming operations have evolved with technology.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 11 Issue 2, Feb 1979, p8-9, il, por
Record #:
31649
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Abstract:
North Carolina tobacco farmers are finding themselves between a rock and a hard place as they face an unexpected cost problem in the operation of mechanized bulk curing barns. The farmers’ concern is shared by the state’s power suppliers because the problem relates to the electricity needed to operate the curers. North Carolina State University agricultural engineers plan to begin experimenting soon to find ways of making bulk barns more energy efficient.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 7 Issue 9, Sept 1975, p16-17, il, por
Record #:
31648
Author(s):
Abstract:
Seventh District Representative Charles G. Rose of Fayetteville believes North Carolina tobacco farmers are not getting a fair share in the market place, and he’s supporting efforts to change that situation. In an interview, Rose discusses the Congressional Rural Caucus, rural development, tobacco allotments, and import tariffs on foreign tobacco.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 7 Issue 9, Sept 1975, p8-9, il, por