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52 results for "Immigrants--North Carolina"
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Record #:
27531
Author(s):
Abstract:
From pita bread to pickles to politics, generations of Lebanese-American families have carried their culture, food, and traditions to North Carolina. While food and agriculture businesses are common in the stories of many Lebanese immigrants, others have been committed to building a strong community through job creation and downtown Raleigh revitalization.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 9, February 2017, p110-115, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27550
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Hispanic population in the Triangle area is growing. Under new amnesty laws passed by Congress, many have been granted legal status. The population in the Triangle is likely around 10, 000 and the immigrant community is profiled. North Carolina has more favorable working and economic conditions than many neighboring states. Most work as migrant workers and construction workers and face many challenges adjusting to American culture and interacting with their neighbors.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 22, August 3-9 1989, p7-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
27756
Author(s):
Abstract:
Marty Rosenbluth has been awarded a Citizen Award by IndyWeek. Rosenbluth is a lawyer who works pro bono for North Carolina’s undocumented residents through his nonprofit, the NC Immigrant’s Rights Project. Rosenbluth is committed to fighting civil rights violations and his work is crucial to the undocumented community who often lack representation.
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Record #:
28043
Author(s):
Abstract:
The NC Dream Team are winners of a 2010 Indy Citizen Award for their positive contribution to society in the Triangle area. The group is made up on undocumented immigrants who are risking deportation to fight for the DREAM Act. Members of the group discuss the difficulties they experience growing up as undocumented immigrants who were brought to the US by their parents and who had no say over their move.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 47, November 2010, p17 Periodical Website
Record #:
27952
Author(s):
Abstract:
Domestic violence in Wake County has spiked recently, especially among immigrants. Domestic violence is often tolerated among women who are immigrants for cultural reasons. Slowly, that trend is being reversed are programs are tailored toward women who are immigrants. Statistics for domestic violence among women who are immigrants and the experiences of Manisha Singh’s as a victim of domestic abuse are shared.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 23, June 2010, p5-7 Periodical Website
Record #:
27961
Author(s):
Abstract:
Immigration reform is desired by many North Carolina residents. Rosario Lopez, Viridiana Martinez, and Loida Silva are three undocumented North Carolina residents who recently completed a hunger strike to try to force Democratic US Senator Kay Hagan to sponsor the DREAM Act. The DREAM Act would children of undocumented immigrants brought to the US legal US citizens. The strike lasted 13 days and brought attention to the issue in the state and the disadvantages children face when they are undocumented.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 26, June 2010, p7 Periodical Website
Record #:
28020
Author(s):
Abstract:
An anonymous Latina woman living in Chapel Hill and her harassment by Bedri Kulla is told to explain the rights that immigrants have in the US when they are victims of a crime. Even if an immigrant is undocumented and not a US citizen, if a crime has been committed against them, they are eligible for legal aid and cannot be deported. Immigrants are often victimized or abused and these women are often afraid to report their abuses and abusers for fear that they will be deported.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 38, September 2010, p16-21 Periodical Website
Record #:
28137
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina politicians, Republican Pat McCrory, Democrat Beverly Perdue, and Democrat Roy Cooper all want to bar aliens from attending community college. This would lead to a permanent underclass of unskilled, menial workers. The group which would be most affected are Mexican immigrants and the history of the oppression and hate directed toward immigrants in America is discussed in the current context.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 23, June 2008, p13 Periodical Website
Record #:
28154
Author(s):
Abstract:
The US Department of Justice sent undercover observers to monitor the polls in Alamance County. Some have speculated that observers were sent after an illegal immigrant in Alamance County was arrested for forging documents obtained through a potential leak by health care officials. Several politicians in the county also ran on anti-immigrant platforms who have raised the question of illegal voting. Observers were present to make sure there were no problems at the polls and the Voting Rights Act was observed.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 45, November 2008, p12 Periodical Website
Record #:
28144
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many immigrants who come to the US from Mexico return after being unable to find opportunities to work or during the winter when farm work is scarce. The Autobuses Adame bus line is often used to help immigrants return as the bus goes straight to the border and is not stopped by customs agents. However, the physical and emotional toll of the journey is difficult for many passengers.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 31, July 2008, p5-7 Periodical Website
Record #:
28190
Author(s):
Abstract:
In North Carolina, many Latinos are deported for minor offenses, not for serious crimes. Examples are provided of how many Latinos in the state have been deported for minor offenses through a process begun by local law enforcement officials under the 287 (g) program. Deportation for minor offenses is not the goal of the 287 (g) program, but local law enforcement have been straying from the rules in some cases. Alamance, Cabarrus, Cumberland, Gaston, Henderson, and Mecklenburg counties, the Wake County Sherriff’s office, and the Durham Police Department all participate in the 287 (g) program. Several graphs and charts provide statistics highlighting the trend.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 52, December 2008, p10-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
28239
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state’s politicians have let Smithfield Packing abuse workers in Tar Heel, and it is time both groups clean up their mess. Smithfield needs to improve working conditions and allow its workers to unionize. The company also needs to improve its plant’s safety, support training and education programs for immigrant Hispanic workers, and stop supporting hog farms which pollute the area water supply. State politicians need to pressure the meatpacker to make these changes to protect workers and the state’s environment.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 15, April 2007, p12 Periodical Website
Record #:
28300
Author(s):
Abstract:
Student activists from Student Action with Farmworkers work on migrant’s behalf in the fields and at the statehouse. The Durham non-profit brings college students together with farmworkers through a 10-week summer internship program. The interns work with advocacy groups to help migrants gain access to health clinics, teach them about the dangers of pesticides, and promote safety in the fields. Others assist migrants with union organizing, teach migrants about their legal rights, or lobby for statewide policy changes on farmworker and immigrant issues.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 33, August 2007, pOnline Periodical Website
Record #:
28347
Author(s):
Abstract:
A recent community event in Chatham County focused on the socio-economic and cultural factors that drive immigrants to risk their lives to come to America. Despite the risks that come with leaving their homes, many Latinos feel the risk is worth it and that North Carolina is a favorable place to live. Speakers and attendees at the event talk about perceptions of America and how to fix some of the problems associated with the immigration system.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 46, November 2007, p4 Periodical Website
Record #:
28751
Abstract:
President Trump’s recent executive order suspends all refugee admissions to the United States for 120 days. Most of the prohibited refugees are citizens of majority-Muslim countries, such as Syria, Libya, Sudan, Somalia, Iran and Iraq. The implications are uncertain for the refugees who have already settled in North Carolina.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 3, Feb 2017, p9-11, il, por Periodical Website
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