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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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34 results for "Health care"
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Record #:
9659
Author(s):
Abstract:
Illegal immigrants who are in North Carolina and who are uninsured for health care are straining already tight budgets in hospitals and threatening to erode the quality of care that hospitals can afford to provide.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 28 Issue 3, Mar 2008, p36-40, 42, 44, 46-47, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
36248
Author(s):
Abstract:
Employment benefits offered by the profiled thirty four companies, ranged from small to large, included mentorships, child and pet friendly policies, free dental care, flexible work scheduling, tuition reimbursement up to $5,000, paid volunteer days, and all-expense paid trips for top performers. Profiled companies included Hill, Chesson, and Woody; N2 Publishing; Practicon; CCS Construction Staffing; Insperity; Williams Mullen; Alston and Bird LLP; and CPI Security.
Record #:
28572
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eugene Woods is the new CEO of Carolinas Health Care System. Woods is ready to expand North Carolina’s largest hospital system amid concerns that it packs too much power. Among the greatest challenges are government mandates and pressure to treat sick people collaboratively while limiting time spent in hospitals.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 37 Issue 3, March 2017, p66-71, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
36170
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Abstract:
A medical care program in America provided knee and hip surgery for Cubans not able to obtain these treatments on their native soil. Expressions of English and Spanish not always understood created a language barrier at times between the patients and surgical team. The nonverbal signs of surgery success, though, required no translation or interpreter.
Record #:
35972
Author(s):
Abstract:
Detailed primarily were eventful and uneventful cases of labor and delivery this doctor attended during his six years of services. His descriptions included timely obstetric practices, such as use of pituitrin, and life threatening childbirth-related conditions like sepsis. As for his patients, offered also were observations that showed his respect for the people and their culture.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p58-65
Record #:
36275
Author(s):
Abstract:
On the downside to the takeover of AI in employment sectors: the elimination of jobs traditionally targeted for elimination, such as factory work; the elimination of highly paid positions such as software designing. Changes that may be a mixed blessing include a minimum guaranteed income provided by the government. However, what may be criticized now as a sign of a socialistic society may one day be regarded as the basis of economic survival.
Record #:
28318
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lisa Sorg describes how important having health insurance was to her development as a child. President George W. Bush is currently threatening to veto a reauthorization and expansion of the State Children’s Health Insurance Program. Several North Carolina politicians have voted against the bill which would dramatically increase the number of uninsured children in the state. The effects of leaving children uninsured in the state and elsewhere are explored.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 40, October 2007, p3 Periodical Website
Record #:
24381
Author(s):
Abstract:
The cost of health-care coverage is rising and many companies are foregoing group insurance policies, instead suggesting employees self-insure.
Record #:
14619
Author(s):
Abstract:
Spencer comments on the state's insufficient standards of education and health for the children of North Carolina. In 1946, newborns were less likely to survive and their mothers more likely to die in childbirth than elsewhere in America. Education and recreational facilities were also lacking in the state when compared to national averages of the time. Blame is placed on lack of state government intervention to remedy these issues.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 25, Nov 1946, p3-4
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Record #:
22565
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This article lists the best hospitals in North Carolina by outright best hospitals, patient picks, cutting-edge hospitals, and top-performing hospitals
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Record #:
39942
Author(s):
Abstract:
Contemporary medical challenges directly impacting the community, health professionals in facilities such as Pitt County’s health department and Vidant Medical Center are optimistic about overcoming. Reason for optimism is reflected in a timeline, containing highlights such as the eradication of diseases such as smallpox, and in the observations of Dr. Earl Trevathan, whose career left him witness and contributor to sixty years of medical advancements.
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Record #:
36073
Author(s):
Abstract:
Steven Powell taught his students that just as crucial was caring about improving the quality of life as well as the number of years in a life. Another valuable lesson he instilled: be a positive influence on campus and off, donning the surgical mask and not.
Record #:
25882
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jonathan Oberlander studies Medicare, Medicaid, and health policy at the state level. According to Oberlander, a national health care system has been difficult to establish because of interests, institutions, and ideology. He thinks we should establish state rather than federal health programs.
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Record #:
24150
Author(s):
Abstract:
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina has a Chapel Hill-based company that provides coverage to over 660,000 people, making it the largest health care provider in North Carolina. The author presents the history of the insurance agency, as well as the positives and negatives of such a large domineering company.
Record #:
24160
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author discusses the impacts of medial reform and Medicare on practitioners and the way primary care facilities are run today.