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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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53 results for "Gardens and gardening"
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Record #:
41098
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Reflecting on the varieties of plants produced also entailed examining initiatives that may yield further success. Through focusing on traditional Southern crops, marginalized native food crops, and tropical perennials, this nonprofit hopes to collaborate with local chefs and farmers to create a hardier and more appealing food system.
Record #:
34509
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In Mount Airy, North Carolina, a couple decides to collaborate with a landscaper to design the perfect gardens to match their quirky house. The front side of the house shows a red brick façade from 1834 that requires a tame, structured garden. The other side is a 20th-century stone addition that requires a whimsical, free-flowing Victorian style garden to go with the kitchen garden.
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Record #:
38139
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The kitchen belonging to the author’s grandmother was a reflection of personal ingenuity as a cook and a time before the predominance of convenience food. Attesting to Bertie Dameron’s creativity in the kitchen included pickled fruit and canning garden vegetables. Reflections of yesteryear included Bertie Dameron buying mountain apples and Georgia peaches from trucks, whose arrival was heralded by telephone party lines.
Record #:
41269
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Community gardens are built in areas and largely maintained by volunteers. Members from different regional gardens meet seasonally to share seeds, tools, and resources.
Source:
Laurel of Asheville (NoCar F 264 A8 L28), Vol. 15 Issue 4, April 2018, p82-84
Record #:
29580
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In the hills outside Asheville, North Carolina, Bob and Judy McLean cultivate six thousand dahlia flowers covering three acres of what they call, Poppins Posies. Originally cultivated by the Aztecs, dahlias are perennial mountain flowers that survive until frost. The McLeans have grown hybrids of dahlias and their garden is now a small family business.
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Record #:
29854
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Thousands of plant species exist in Western North Carolina, and it can become difficult for gardeners to remember all the plant names. Garden designer Nancy Duffy created a smart phone and computer application that gives gardeners the ability to tag plants and keep organized digital records for their garden. The Muddy Boots Plant Tags are also being used in a series of garden tours hosted by Bullington Gardens of Hendersonville.
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Record #:
29885
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Asheville Hydroponics and Organics is a garden shop that specializes in growing vegetables, fruits and non-edibles without soil. Co-owners Andrew Morris and Evan Godlesky also collaborate with community programs teaching locals about hydroponic and organic gardens.
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Record #:
34806
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As the population of North Carolina becomes more diverse, so too does the variety of greenery and vegetables in gardens all over the state. African and Asian varieties are especially popular, with the introduction of plants like bitter melon, bok choy, cassava, and rice.
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Record #:
34800
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Broccoli is a fairly adaptive vegetable to grow and well-suited for the Carolinas. This article discusses where, when, and how to grow broccoli in your home garden, as well as the best varieties to grow in North Carolina.
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Record #:
34804
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Pears are one of the hardiest and easiest fruiting trees to plant in North Carolina. Not only do they yield fruit early, but they are also cost-effective, can cross-pollinate, and sprout beautiful white flowers in the Spring.
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Record #:
34801
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Abstract:
Cauliflower is a more difficult vegetable to grow but is well-suited for some areas in the Carolinas. This article discusses where, when, and how to grow cauliflower in your home garden, as well as the best places to buy seeds in North Carolina.
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Record #:
34809
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Bacterial spot and bacterial speck have both become large issues for many regions across North and South Carolina. It mostly materializes on tomato plants but can also spread to peppers and eggplants if not properly treated. Spraying and planting in pots can help deter bacterial rot in plants.
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Record #:
34811
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Nan and Saul Chase have cultivated a once-bare plot in Asheville into a thriving kitchen garden. All plants within the tiny .09 acre lot are edible, and include hot peppers, crabapples, berry bushes, and other varieties of vegetable.
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Record #:
34808
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A wide variety of pumpkins can be grown in the Carolinas. They need plenty of space, sun, water, and good soil in order to grow. This article gives tips and tricks to ensuring that your next pumpkin crop is healthy.
Source:
Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 29 Issue 3, April 2017, p54-55, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34810
Author(s):
Abstract:
Blueberries are a hardy, versatile fruit-bearing shrub that does well in the Carolinas. This article outlines the ways to grow and care for blueberry bushes and which variety to choose in each climate.
Source:
Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 29 Issue 4, May 2017, p54-55, il, por Periodical Website