NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


17 results for "Barbecue cookery"
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
5224
Author(s):
Abstract:
How you like your barbecue depends on where you live in the state, east or west of Raleigh. Easterners like it chopped, vinegary-sauced, and whole-hog used. Westerners prefer it from the shoulder, tomato-sauced, and sliced. Tomlin discusses the two sides and their passionate supporters.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
27324
Author(s):
Abstract:
Little Pigs Bar-B-Q is Asheville’s oldest continuously operating restaurant. It has been open 53 years and stands out among Asheville’s diverse cuisine due to its simple philosophy.
Record #:
10810
Author(s):
Abstract:
In California, barbecue is considered a verb, or something that one would do. In North Carolina, the author's home state, barbecue is a noun, or something that one would eat. In California, and other places outside of the South, barbecue is a flavor, a smoke, or a sauce; barbecuing is something done on a spit or over open coals. Down South, barbecue is a thing, a finished product ready to be eaten: crisp bits of pork that have been slow roasted over an open fire, basted with sauce, and usually served with cole slaw and corn bread.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 19, Mar 1969, p14, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
10510
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Starlight Inn in Ayden is one of the featured barbecue restaurants in a new book, HOLY SMOKE: THE BIG BOOK OF NORTH CAROLINA BARBECUE. The almost 75-year-old business has garnered many national awards during the years, the latest being the prestigious 2003 James Beard Foundation America's Classics award.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
7987
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this ongoing series of favorite Southern dishes, Garner discusses the delights of barbecue and the distinct styles of preparing and serving it that developed in the Coastal Plain and in the Piedmont. He lists several eating establishments that serve good barbecue: Grady's Barbecue (Dudley); Cook's Barbecue (Lexington); and Troutman's Barbecue (Denton).
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p36-38, 40, 42-43, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
5366
Author(s):
Abstract:
When Clyde Cooper opened Cooper's Barbecue on East Davis Street in Raleigh in 1938, he proclaimed it \"a good place to eat.\" Sixty-four years later that's still true. Jackson takes the reader inside the restaurant which still maintains the look and feel of an old-time barbecue joint in the shadow of modern, downtown Raleigh buildings.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 4, Sept 2002, p157-158, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
13676
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lee extols the virtues of eastern-style BBQ over the western tomato-based style.
Subject(s):
Record #:
6414
Author(s):
Abstract:
Barbecue is the holy grub in North Carolina. Lovers of this delicacy differ over which type is better--vinegar-base barbecue or tomato-base barbecue. Whatever an individual's preference, there are a number of restaurants to satisfy any palate. Early describes a number of these including the Pink Supper House (Wallace); B's Barbecue (Greenville); Barbecue Inn (Asheville); and the Carolina Bar-B-Q (Statesville).
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
1923
Author(s):
Abstract:
On one Saturday every October, residents of Lexington welcome visitors around the nation to the Lexington Barbecue Festival, which celebrates the beauty of tomato-based barbecue.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 5, Oct 1994, p20-21
Full Text:
Record #:
8447
Author(s):
Abstract:
Most North Carolinians do not need to be told what a pig pickin' or a pig pull is. Because state citizens love pork and an outdoor shindig so much, former Governor Robert Scott in 1972 declared the state the Pig Pickin' Capital of the World. Sargent describes what is involved in a traditional pig pickin': selecting the pig, building the barbecue pit, building the fire, and placing the pig on the grill.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 6 Issue 9, Sept 1974, p12-13, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
6648
Abstract:
Caviness discusses Kepley's Pit-Cooked Barbecue, which was founded by Hayden Odell Kepley. Kepley opened his restaurant on June 10, 1948, in High Point. It has remained virtually unchanged since its opening and is the city's oldest restaurant conducting business at its original location.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 12, May 2004, p172-173, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
4062
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lexington has always been famous for its old-fashioned southern barbecue, and during the annual Barbecue Festival in October, over 120,000 people fill its eighteen barbecue restaurants. Now two additional attractions have come to town, the Bob Timberlake Gallery and the Richard Childress Racing Museum. Both attract over 100,000 yearly.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 1, Jan 1999, p44, il
Record #:
29079
Abstract:
Daniel Solis is the creator of Belle of the Ball and other non-digital games. Solis is also part of Game Designers of North Carolina, a group that meets regularly at game stores, such as Atomic Empire in Durham and The Gamer’s Armory in Cary. The group hopes to bring greater awareness of gaming to the mainstream.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 24, July 2017, p16-17, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
5916
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ayden in Pitt County is the home of Pete Jones's famous barbecue joint, the Starlight Inn. The 70-year-old business has garnered many national awards during the years, the latest being the 2003 James Beard Foundation America's Classics award, which was only given to five restaurants nationwide.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 3, Aug 2003, p139-141, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
27445
Author(s):
Abstract:
Brunswick stew is a common dish in North Carolina barbecue and often served at church events. Traditionally made with squirrel or possum, today’s versions usually stick to chicken and sometimes pork. Hillsborough BBQ Company adds rabbit to the poultry and pig.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 40, Oct 2016, p19, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text: