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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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12 results for McGaw, Melissa [Photographer]
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Record #:
20829
Abstract:
The dog breeds of the North American Versatile Hunting Dog Association (NAVHDA), mostly of continental European descent, are expected to perform a number of hunting activities like pointing, retrieving upland birds on land and in water, track furred or feathered game on land, and be cooperative yet independent while doing so. The article includes four kinds of tests to see how many of these skills each dog has and pictures and a brief sketch of the breeds in the Carolinas chapter.
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Record #:
21733
Abstract:
Shaffner, a fishing guide in northwestern North Carolina, describes fishing for smallmouth bass in a very under-utilized fishery--the tributaries of large smallmouth bass rivers. He considers it the state's greatest freshwater game fish. He provides information on some of the streams listed by their river basins, such as the Yadkin River, New River, and French Broad River basins, as well as tackle and techniques to use.
Record #:
21931
Abstract:
Some turkey hunters enjoy the hunt, while others enjoy it but also have a passion for collecting the old handmade turkey calls.
Record #:
22360
Abstract:
Smuggling reptiles and amphibians out of North Carolina is a multi-million dollar industry. There include snakes, turtles, and frogs that are sought for their skins, to use as food, and for the occult. Cantrell relates how North Carolina Wildlife Enforcement officers are increasing their efforts to prevent this illegal trade.
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Record #:
22386
Abstract:
The Dream Hunting and Fishing Program grants wishes for kids who need a little help participating in these activities.
Record #:
22391
Abstract:
There was a time when hunting was looked upon as a purely male activity, whether it was for food or sport. However, that image is changing in the state as more women are taking to the fields and forests. \"Concern about food sources, escape from stressful daily lives, and the thrill of the hunt\" are among reasons given. Statistics from the NC Wildlife Resources Commission indicate that during the last five years hunting licenses issued to women have increased to 22,000 in 2013 from under 16,000 in 2009. Four women, all young, avid, expert hunters, relate their experiences.
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Record #:
21086
Abstract:
Zlotnicki visits Wake County gunsmith Dan Hopping's workshop and describes how he makes the old flintlock rifles.
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Record #:
28440
Abstract:
North Carolina has some of the most diverse fisheries in the nation. The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission operates six fish hatcheries, which have evolved to produce a variety of species and serve new needs throughout the state.
Record #:
28438
Abstract:
For years, forty yards was the limit most hunters imposed on themselves for shooting at a wild turkey. Advancements in ammunition shells and chokes allow North Carolina turkey hunters to take aim from farther away than before.
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Record #:
22613
Abstract:
The Apalachia Reservoir is the first reservoir in North Carolina to be managed as a trophy trout fishery. In 2012 the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission stocked 5,000 trout (brown and rainbow). The stocks have continued to thrive as they take advantage of the presence of the invasive blueback herring.
Record #:
22610
Abstract:
It is time for the annual Sedgefield Hunt and Carolinas Foxhound Performance Trial at Sandhills Gameland in Richmond County, NC, a 9,009 acre area devoted to bird dog field trials. The trials, which began in 1954, include social events, horse and hound beauty treatments, and foxhound competitions.