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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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18 results for Clark, Joseph D
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Record #:
16361
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The literature of folk medicine indicates that for several centuries many folk believed without reservation in the magical power of madstones, supposedly originating as hair or fiber balls in the stomachs of ruminants such as deer, cow, or buffalo. Others were tabasheer, an opal found in the joints of bamboo, while still others were picked in open fields or river beds being associated with halloysite, a clay mineral. These stones were applied to wounds to absorb venom. Clark discusses their ownership, physical origins and characteristics, their uses in treating wounds, their efficacy, and the views of the believers and unbelievers.
Record #:
16357
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This listing is a supplement to Professor Clark's Madstones in North Carolina (presented in North Carolina Folklore Journal March 1976, Vol. 24:1), an exhaustive study of the curious natural stones and stone-like products of the stomachs and gall bladders of animals used in folk medicine.
Record #:
16367
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North Carolina, like most parts of the nation, has inherited much medical folklore from British, European, and other sources. Among the most tenacious early folk medical practices to live on into the 20th-century is the primitive custom of pulling patients through or passing them through holes in trees, stones, or in the earth, or moving them, or causing them to walk, crawl, or creep through a variety of natural or man-made apertures for the curing of disease.
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Record #:
16428
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Halloween has had a diverting and circuitous development from ancient times to the present. Clark presents the history and development of All Saint's Day and Halloween from its ancient customs to present activities.
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Record #:
16444
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John Brickell, a colonial medical doctor in North Carolina, exemplifies the ingenuity of the common folk--more often than not he prescribed the same medicine, be it animal or plant or mineral in origin, for not one ailment but several. Clark presents several of the remedies found in Brickell's treatise.
Record #:
16445
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Clark presents 1683 entries of popular belief and superstition widespread across North Carolina and gathered from magazines, monographs, newspapers, and other texts. The beliefs are divided between such entries as birth, infancy, and childhood; human body; domestic pursuits; economic and social relations; travel; love; death; witchcraft; seasons; weather; animals; and plants.
Record #:
16459
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This article provides a compilation of North Carolina superstitions gathered by Joseph D. Clark since 1955 during his career at North Carolina State University. The superstitions relate to many areas such as birth, death, the human body, and more.
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Record #:
35146
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A short collection of riddles with a prelude about how and which riddles have survived.
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Record #:
35176
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A brief introduction about the reasoning behind superstitions leads to several lists of superstitions, which are organized by category.
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Record #:
35173
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Several pages of common riddles and their variations that had been collected from students in North Carolina State College.
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Record #:
35182
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This is a list of folk speech submitted by the author’s students. It is organized alphabetically with analysis and translation for each word.
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Record #:
35289
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The history of proverbial sayings is long and vast, many of which belong to a set of poetic devices. The author has categorized some of these sayings under headings such as “identified old and familiar sayings,” “unidentified old and familiar sayings,” “humorous and cynical sayings,” and “metaphors and similes.”
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Record #:
35298
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In life, Cecil Sharp was an avid collector of folksongs, particularly from the mountains of North Carolina. His background in musicology from Cambridge University in England aided him in publishing many works about preserving indigenous folklore.
Record #:
35449
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As a folklorist in North Carolina, Burke Davis collected a wide variety of folk customs for his book, The Summer Land. Within the book are folkloric elements relating to customs, speech, domestic tasks, hunting, and more.
Record #:
35458
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A doctor was taught a new method delivering babies when several women used tobacco smoke to induce the final stage of labor.