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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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10 results for Bishir, Catherine W
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Record #:
7800
Abstract:
Innovative projects are bringing historic mill buildings back to life all across North Carolina. No longer eyesores, renovated mills have become desirable features in the economic and social fabric of their communities. Renovated buildings become sites for restaurants, stores, and condominiums. Among topics discussed are the costs of renovation, quality of original construction, impact on the neighborhood, and local participation.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 129, Spring 2006, p10-11, il
Record #:
16959
Abstract:
Asher Benjamin did not personally work or live in the state but his treatise on architecture, Practical House Carpenter, influenced North Carolinian's private residences and public structures. In the Practical House Carpenter (1830), Asher emphasizes Greek Revival, an architectural style that became popular around this time throughout New England. Greek Revival became the preferred style across the state in the prosperous antebellum era.
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Record #:
18842
Abstract:
Hundreds of years ago, the need to maintain a certain aesthetic for a town was usually written into the town's building rules. This philosophy is making its way back into historic preservation in North Carolina.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 50, May/June 1984, p1, 9-10, f
Record #:
19223
Abstract:
Raleigh is a quickly growing city which greatly impacts city planning, especially finding a balance between retaining historic structures with character and also modernizing. Interviewing prominent Raleigh citizens and members of the Raleigh Historic Sites Commission, the author outlines the development of historic preservation within the city.
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Record #:
21442
Abstract:
A look at the design and construction of the neoclassical style mansion at Hayes plantation near Edenton, which comes from a unique blend of architectural traditions and changing building practices, from established regional traditions, and from emerging national and international trends.
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Record #:
21465
Abstract:
Throughout the history of North Carolina, from the initial colonization up to the present day, black artisans and craftsmen play an important role in creating the architecture of the state. Black slaves and freedmen worked in all the construction trades, even in creative and independent roles. Through their contribution to the state's architectural heritage some of the North Carolina's finest old structures were created.
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Record #:
21647
Abstract:
This article examines how late 19th century Confederate memorial associations in Raleigh affected the commemoration of Confederate war dead. These organizations were created to found and care for permanent Confederate cemeteries, organize commemorative functions, and sponsor Confederate monuments. Women often provided the leadership of these associations, establishing themselves as capable of public leadership roles.
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Record #:
22765
Abstract:
North Carolina has rich African American history, but only after the Civil Rights Movement did local and state monuments begin to publicly commemorate this history. Architectural historian, Catherine Bishir, identifies many important African American monuments in the state and explains that the time-period during which they were constructed can tell us much about the state's past.
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Record #:
19048
Abstract:
A recent research project at Tryon Palace is exploring the history of African-American artisans in New Bern from the American Revolution to the turn of the 20th-century. Due to the city's tradition of craftsmanship and strong African American heritage, New Bern offers the opportunity to document this unique artistic tradition.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Fall 2009, p6-7, 12, f
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Record #:
18865
Abstract:
In this seminal article of a series of biographies of North Carolina artisans, Bishir et al. discuss the work of Hardy B. Lane and his three sons, prominent North Carolina carpenter-builders in the 19th-century New Bern.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 64, July/Aug 1986, p1-3, f