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8 results for Architecture--North Carolina
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Record #:
12785
Abstract:
Each year, members of the North Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, submit plans and pictures of their selected works for competitive judging. In 1963, there were five winners. The Honor Award winner, architect Arthur R. Cogswell, Jr., of Chapel Hill, earned distinction by designing his own home. The First National Bank Building in Albemarle, branch offices for First Citizens Bank, the Central Fire Station in Hickory, and the Hanes Medical Center, constitute the remaining four recipients.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 23, Apr 1963, p25-39, 31, il
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Record #:
16959
Abstract:
Asher Benjamin did not personally work or live in the state but his treatise on architecture, Practical House Carpenter, influenced North Carolinian's private residences and public structures. In the Practical House Carpenter (1830), Asher emphasizes Greek Revival, an architectural style that became popular around this time throughout New England. Greek Revival became the preferred style across the state in the prosperous antebellum era.
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Record #:
21465
Abstract:
Throughout the history of North Carolina, from the initial colonization up to the present day, black artisans and craftsmen play an important role in creating the architecture of the state. Black slaves and freedmen worked in all the construction trades, even in creative and independent roles. Through their contribution to the state's architectural heritage some of the North Carolina's finest old structures were created.
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Record #:
25637
Abstract:
Since 1980, in Wake, Durham, and Orange counties about 10,000 non-residential buildings, 25,000 multi-family units, and 40,000 single-family homes have been built. THE INDEPENDENT examines the architecture of five recently designed structures to find out how each of these building styles will shape the Triangle’s urban landscape.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 4 Issue 1, January 17-30 1986, p1, 10-13, por Periodical Website
Record #:
16095
Abstract:
The first installment in a series, Cockshutt, head of the Survey and Planning Branch, looks chronologically at changing architectural style and building techniques within the state. The earliest period between the 18th- and early 19th-century, builders relied heavily on wood and later brick. Structures were solid and well-crafted by skilled workmen from the state's abundant resources.
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Record #:
16097
Abstract:
Part II in the series explores examples of early buildings exhibiting specific styles popular between the 1600s and early 1800s. The three styles highlighted are Medieval European, Georgian, and Federal.
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Record #:
16098
Abstract:
Part III of V in the series discusses the popularity Greek Revival within the state. Greek Revival was preferred throughout the country and peaked in the state between the 1830s and 1840s. The style affected design of both interiors and exteriors and some of the hallmarks were columns and larger broader rooms anchored by a central hall feature.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 15 Issue 3, Fall 1976, p19-24, il
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Record #:
28840
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Abstract:
The American Institute of Architects (AIA) Triangle Chapter’s Design Awards recognizes the local architecture profession’s most talented designers. The 2009 awards acknowledged varied institutional and residential projects, including an addition to a historic church, a restaurant and a new installation in the North Carolina Museum of Art’s Art Park.
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