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237 results for "Martin, Edward"
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Record #:
40615
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A Duke University researcher became a whistleblower when suspecting that a colleague’s research results were skewed. The case became a reminder as to how often data is manipulated, why researchers may feel pressured to include false data, and why research integrity is crucial.
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38234
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North Carolina led the way in the United States in outlawing the practice of payday lending. However, still in place are socioeconomic conditions that make it a feasible option for some. Because of such factors, the pressure is mounting for its legislative repeal.
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38242
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Defined as the Olympic Games equivalent for horses is the World Equestrian Games. Cited as the most attended sports event in the state, its projected revenue was 400 million dollars. The thirteen-day event was expected to impact the economies of towns such as Asheville and Hendersonville. Tryon International Equestrian Center’s as its locale can be attributed to its efforts at revitalizing the surrounding job market, in initiatives such as reviving All American Homes of North Carolina, Inc. as US Precision Construction LLC. Choosing North Carolina as its site may be a nod to its reputation for producing thoroughbreds such as Sir Archie, whose descendants include Secretariat, Seattle Slew, and Native Dancer.
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38237
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Cannon Mills’ company identity became associated with Cabarrus County and Concord. Today, its image reflects non-profit rather than profit based pursuits. Descendants of its founders are investing in higher education institutions across the state like Brevard College and local charities like Cabarrus Red Cross. The family’s hometown, touted as the 11th fastest growing city in North Carolina, shows economic promise in historic buildings such as the renovated Hotel Concord, slated to contain forty apartments and five commercial spaces.
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28472
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Film industry spending in North Carolina has declined significantly over the last five years. The industry has suffered after the General Assembly gutted a more generous incentive program three years ago. While North Carolina’s film infrastructure is one of the best outside of California, film production companies are lured elsewhere because of better incentives. Unclear is how the 2016 House Bill 2 or “bathroom bill” has affected the state’s ability to attract films.
Record #:
28478
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The environmental impact of hurricanes Matthew and Floyd are compared. Floyd cost more than 11.3 billion dollars in 2017 dollars, more than triple Matthew’s losses. Floyd destroyed $1.1 billion in crops, livestock, and farm buildings versus $544 million because of Matthew. While the losses from 2016’s Matthew were not as bad as 1999’s Floyd, problems still exist especially concerning the state’s hog industry, water and sewer systems, and poultry industry.
Record #:
28482
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After the second major flood brought on by a hurricane in 20 years, North Carolina farmers are attempting to come back once again. The story of how the Tyner family in Wilson County, NC are recovering highlights the struggles faced by many area farmers after the flooding from hurricane Matthew.
Record #:
28572
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Eugene Woods is the new CEO of Carolinas Health Care System. Woods is ready to expand North Carolina’s largest hospital system amid concerns that it packs too much power. Among the greatest challenges are government mandates and pressure to treat sick people collaboratively while limiting time spent in hospitals.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 37 Issue 3, March 2017, p66-71, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
28578
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After several false starts, North Carolina’s most famous tobacco town, Winston-Salem, shows signs of rebirth. Winston-Salem is transforming into an apex of biomedical research, education and technology with the help of Wake Forest University and Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and School of Medicine.
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Record #:
28742
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Lowe’s Cos.’ aggressive attempt to establish a market for its hardwarde stores in Australia has failed. The result will cost the company nearly $1 billion dollars as Lowes could not compete with Australia’s Masters Home Improvement stores. The reasons the expansion failed and Lowe’s growth as a company are detailed.
Record #:
28748
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Bedless hospitals, virtual intensive care, and office visits by phone will transform the state’s $70 billion health care economy. Virtual medicine is beginning a trend to make a patient’s home the setting of care. The technology has pros and cons and the opportunity to revolutionize the industry.
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Record #:
36260
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Many businesses in Swain and Jackson County prepared for potential tourist influx and ensuring economic impact generated by that year’s solar eclipse. From it were hotels offering special lodging packages and hotels in towns such as Sylva anticipating lodging inventory sell-out.
Record #:
39589
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The closing of Eden’s MillerCoors negatively impacted the town’s other large business, Morehead Memorial Hospital. Its closing served as a reminder of factors that leave towns like Eden and its rural Rockingham County economically vulnerable, such as brain drain and the rural-urban divide. Believed reasons why it closed included Anheuser-Busch In-Bev’s purchased SAB-Miller not having competition. Believed reasons why it remains closed includes the Economic Development Partnership of North Carolina favoring cities.
Record #:
24793
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Journalist Edward Martin describes the plans for North Carolina roads and public transit systems during the next decade. He emphasizes that many lawmakers are concerned a decade will not improve the heavy traffic problems if the government does not begin to look for funds outside of the taxpayers’ pocket.
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