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39 results for "Lee, David S."
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Record #:
1465
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A few years ago the osprey neared extinction as eggshell thinning, caused by DDT, reduced populations. Yet once regulations banned the use of pesticides that accumulate in such organisms as fish, on which ospreys feed, populations stabilized.
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1485
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Dinosaur fossils have been discovered along the banks of the Cape Fear River. Lee discusses his lifelong interest in the creatures and relates information about current theories concerning dinosaurs in North Carolina and throughout North America.
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2460
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Found in swamps and other freshwater habitats in the Sandhills and the Coastal Plain, the cottonmouth moccasin is a dangerous snake and best left alone. The largest eastern cottonmouth ever measured, caught in the Dismal Swamp, was over six feet.
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2732
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The prothonotary warbler, a brilliantly colored orange-yellow bird with a distinctive song, summers among the state's coastal woodlands, swamps, and rivers, before returning to Central and South America.
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2891
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Dr. Rowland Shelley, Curator of Invertebrates at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Science, is one of the world's leading experts on millipedes and centipedes.
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2929
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Although they range all over the country, no bird is more closely associated with the South than the mockingbird, which has the ability to mimic the songs of other birds.
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2952
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While people may not consider them beautiful birds and cringe at their eating habits, vultures are capable of astounding feats of flying and also perform a useful service by disposing of dead animals and plants.
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3591
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The cardinal is one of the most popular of all songbirds. It is a favorite of bird watchers. Seven states use it as their state bird. It appears on many items at Christmas, and twenty-two college and two professional teams use it as their symbol.
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Record #:
4591
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Not all birds built nests in trees or bushes. Many are satisfied with a hole in a tree trunk. Holes have advantages. They offer more protection from predators, more shelter from the weather, and building skills are not required. Among cavity- dwelling birds are the kestrel, wood duck, belted king fisher, common flicker, and various songbirds.
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Record #:
4692
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In the mid-1970s, the red-shouldered hawk was endangered in the state, having experienced a 65 to 74 percent drop in population the previous twenty years. By the year 2000, recovering bottomland hardwood forests again provide suitable habitats, and the species population is again stable. Lee describes the hawk's habitat, food, and nesting habits.
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5849
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The doodlebug has a name that implies an idler; however, this insect is actually a patient, skillful hunter-trapper. Lee provides a close-up view of the creature's habits.
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Record #:
6656
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North Carolina has extensive coastal estuaries and wetland habitats. Because of this, an impressive array of herons, bitterns, and ibises make their homes there. Lee discusses nesting habits, characteristic feeding behaviors, and seasonal occurrences of these birds.
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Record #:
6740
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North Carolina has extensive coastal estuaries and wetland habitats. Because of this, an impressive array of herons, bitterns, and ibises make their homes there. Seventeen types of waders have been documented in the state. In Part Two of this series, Lee discusses nesting habits, characteristic feeding behaviors, and seasonal occurrences of another six of these birds.
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Record #:
7195
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Most of the world's wild Venus's flytraps are located within a seventy-five-mile radius of Wilmington, North Carolina. There the flytraps find the necessary ingredients for survival -- damp, acidic soils in open-canopy forests or on the edges of pocosins. Of the more than 450 carnivorous plants in the world, North Carolina's flytrap has the distinction of being the first to be recognized by science for its ability to capture insects. Colonial governor Arthur Dobbs wrote about the plant in 1760. Other writers on the plant have included Charles Darwin and botanist B.W. Wells.
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Record #:
8053
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Lee describes his attempt to create a small but virtually self-sustaining stand of longleaf pine that will support many species of longleaf dependent birds and terrestrial animals. The longleaf restoration is part of a larger effort to restore a 130-acre tract of land that Lee and his wife own in Bladen County to make it more favorable to native wildlife.
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