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5 results for Carnivorous plants
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Record #:
2404
Abstract:
There are five groups of insectivorous, or insect eating, plants found across the state. They are the pitcher plant, Venus flytrap, sundew, bladderwort, and butterwort.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 55 Issue 1, June 1987, p12, il
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Record #:
3507
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The Venus' Flytrap grows only within a 50-to-75-mile radius of Wilmington in the coastal bogs. Discovered in 1760 by Governor Arthur Dobbs, the rare plant is protected by law against unauthorized removal.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 1997, p18-19, il Periodical Website
Record #:
6640
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Five groups of carnivorous plants are found in all regions of the state, but are most common in the Coastal Plain. In recent years the environment where these plants grow is being destroyed as wetlands are being drained for housing developments, pine plantations, and golf courses. Plant poaching is also a serious threat for some species. Adams describes each of the five groups of plants: Venus flytrap, pitcher plant, bladderwort, butterwort, and sundew.
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Record #:
10783
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Columbus and Brunswick Counties in Southeastern North Carolina are home to three unusual varieties of insectivorous plants. The Venus Fly Trap, the pitcher plant (Sarracenia), and sundews (Drosera) have each developed unique methods of capturing small animals and insects that once trapped, seldom escape. Brilliant colors, savory tastes, and perfumed aromas combine to lure even the most cautious creatures to their death.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 11, Nov 1968, p11, 17, il
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Record #:
7195
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Most of the world's wild Venus's flytraps are located within a seventy-five-mile radius of Wilmington, North Carolina. There the flytraps find the necessary ingredients for survival -- damp, acidic soils in open-canopy forests or on the edges of pocosins. Of the more than 450 carnivorous plants in the world, North Carolina's flytrap has the distinction of being the first to be recognized by science for its ability to capture insects. Colonial governor Arthur Dobbs wrote about the plant in 1760. Other writers on the plant have included Charles Darwin and botanist B.W. Wells.
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