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11 results for "Krochmal, Arnold"
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Record #:
8937
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Abstract:
In 1959 Arnold Krochmal was a new park ranger in the Great Smokey Mountain National Park. It was rumored that moonshiners were active in the park. Another ranger rented a plane and found nine stills making moonshine within the park boundaries. Krochmal and his fellow rangers hiked through the forest and found one of the stills. They also spotted two men carrying burlap sacks over their shoulders. The two men fled into the woods. The rangers made no arrest but took the sacks as evidence of moonshining activity.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 9, Feb 1984, p22-23, por
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Record #:
9584
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Wild boars were introduced in North Carolina in 1912 when a shipment of twelve boars arrived at a hunting lodge near Robbinsville. By 1920, the original number had grown to over one hundred. Several escaped their pens and spread into the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. U.S. Forest Service officials sponsored several hunting expeditions to kill the wild boards because of their threat to native wildlife. Their population has been reduced, but it has not been eradicated.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 12, May 1984, p14-15, il, map
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Record #:
35689
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Drying, preparing, or blanching were economic and easy alternatives to canning, the authors proposed. Proof in this pudding could be found in their directions for these methods, along with an image of a drying box and timetable for blanching a variety of fruits and vegetables.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p45
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Record #:
35681
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Shrubs that can make a lovely addition to a landscape included Pyracantha and Holly, according to the author. How they can be useful to creatures of the two or many legged kind include becoming a border for a walkway or food for birds. Factors to consider for making them a valuable part of the landscape: types of fertilizer, pruning times, optimal planting depths, and common shrub problems.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p31-33
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Record #:
8403
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The Cherokee healed their sick with a combination of herbal treatments, invocations to deities, rituals to counteract witchcraft, and limited surgery. Most surgeries consisted of scarification. Tools such as flint arrowheads, turkey leg bones, sucking horns, and blackberry stickers were used to perform surgeries. Herbal medicines such as Joe Pyeweed (Eupatorium) were also used to treat the sick.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 11, Apr 1985, p15, il
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Record #:
2404
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There are five groups of insectivorous, or insect eating, plants found across the state. They are the pitcher plant, Venus flytrap, sundew, bladderwort, and butterwort.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 55 Issue 1, June 1987, p12, il
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Record #:
8775
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Started in 1972, Aqua-10 Corporation near Beaufort harvests seaweed and makes it into a concentrate used in crop spraying. Used primarily as a fertilizer supplement, this concentrate improves plant growth and development, may protect against frost damage, and is proven beneficial when used over several years.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 11, Apr 1982, p22
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Record #:
35696
Abstract:
The Black Drink and Great Man, or a variety of tea and the known commonly gingsen, were among the multitude of remedies the Cherokee and Catawba produced from wild herbs. Such remedies, shamans in Nations such as these used in centuries past to treat a variety of medical conditions. What is modern is the regard for these remedies’ effectiveness, in particular for their power to provide a holistic cure.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1978, p60-62
Record #:
35810
Abstract:
The authors asserted them as a healthy and free supplement to the modern American diet: wild plants. To assure the collection is healthy were books such as Walter Muenscher’s Poisonous Plants of the United States and A Guide to Medicinal Plants of the United States. Helping to concoct a recipe for success were plants that could be eaten raw (dandelions and onions), ones that must be cooked (burdock roots and milkweed), and dishes such as dandelion salad.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p48-49
Record #:
8742
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Abstract:
The Cherokee Indian Hospital in Cherokee provides free medical services to all Qualla tribe members. Built in 1981, the single story structure cost $12 million to build. Although the hospital incorporates many modern treatments, traditional healing, characteristic of the Cherokee culture, is used here as well.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 10, Mar 1982, p19, il
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Record #:
8582
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Reports are given every fall, informing tourists of the period when mountain forest leaves will be at their peak color. Predicting this peak, however, is impossible, according to former U.S. Forest Service employees Arnold and Connie Krochmal. Color change in leaves varies by species and by individual tree, and the Krochmal's argue that elevation has no affect on the timing of a tree's color change. Leaves that change from green to yellow or orange are experiencing a physical change as the green chlorophyll dies. When this happens, the yellow colors that were present are able to be seen, as they are no longer masked by the leaf's green pigments. Leaves that change from green to a red or a purple are undergoing a chemical change, as plant foods stored in the leaf are converted to different compounds known as anthocyanins.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 4, Sept 1983, p8-9, por
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