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5 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 82 Issue 4, July/Aug 2018
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Record #:
34400
Abstract:
Ocean fishing piers have been a part of the North Carolina seascape for over ninety years, since the construction of the state’s first ocean pier at Kure Beach in 1923. In the 1970s through the late 1980s, as many as thirty-five functioning fishing piers graced over three-hundred miles of North Carolina’s ocean coastline. Because different species tend to gravitate to different areas of the surf, there are five fishing zones along the pier which require different techniques and gear.
Record #:
34398
Author(s):
Abstract:
Biologist Susan Campbell has been banding and studying ruby-throated hummingbirds in North Carolina for over twenty years. Her research has shown that these hummingbirds usually return to the same location every spring. More and more hummingbirds have been found overwintering along the coast, especially in the Outer Banks, due to warmer climate and plentiful food.
Record #:
34399
Author(s):
Abstract:
Crappie are one of anglers’ favorite freshwater fish in North Carolina. The fish are spread out in shallow water during the spring, but move to deeper water in the summer. Two Triangle-area fishing guides share their knowledge and offer tips on catching crappie in Jordan Reservoir and Shearon Harris Lake.
Record #:
34402
Author(s):
Abstract:
Henry Snuggs combines his passion for woodworking and fish into a unique artform called Uncle Henry’s Artofishals. Similar to decoy carvings used in duck hunting or ice fishing, Henry carves and paints decorative fish that he calls “realistic folk art.” The carvings are three-dimensional and suspended, making the fish appear to be swimming.
Subject(s):
Record #:
34401
Author(s):
Abstract:
Timber rattlesnakes vary geographically across the North Carolina Mountains, Piedmont, and Coastal Plain. The timber rattlesnake and canebrake rattlesnake are two forms of the same species which vary in their identifying characteristics and behaviors. This article discusses the biology and ecology of these snakes.