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5 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 72 Issue 6, June 2008
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Record #:
10150
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Wilson discusses catch-and-release fishing in North Carolina. The program came to the state in 1954 on trout streams in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The program is an approach to having more fish available to catch and emphasizes the recreational rather than the consumptive value of fish.
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Record #:
10151
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Earley describes a way of fishing along North Carolina's coasts that is slowly disappearing--long-haul net fishing. The technique is expensive and labor intensive and requires coordination among the boats involved. In the 1970s and 1980s, around a dozen long-haul crews worked Core Sound, but it 2007, the number has been reduced to two crews.
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Record #:
10149
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Kenneth A. Wilson was one of the first wildlife biologists hired by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission in 1947. He was the state's first expert on furbearing animals and trapping. His research, writing, teaching, and other public contacts laid the groundwork for other wildlife scientists who would follow him. He retired in 1970.
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Record #:
10153
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Wilson discusses progress in the Roanoke River American Shad Restoration Program, which was started over a decade ago to enhance the depleted fishery.
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Record #:
10152
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Beane discusses the pygmy rattlesnake, sistrurus, which is North Carolina's smallest venomous snake.
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