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5 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 71 Issue 4, Apr 2007
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Record #:
8797
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Brook trout have lived in North Carolina's mountain streams since the last ice age of 10,000 years ago. The Southern Appalachian-strain brook trout is the state's only native trout. However, their population has been declining because of development-related pollution and poor land management practices associated with agriculture. Besler discusses ways the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission has partnered with other groups to ensure streams where the brook trout live are protected and restored.
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Record #:
8852
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Beane discusses the gopher frog, a creature that few North Carolinians have ever heard of, let alone seen. There are three species in the South--the Florida gopher frog, the dusky gopher frog of the Gulf Coast, and the Carolina gopher frog. The Carolina frog has symmetrically arranged warts that give a cobblestone texture to its skin. All three species enter the water only to breed; otherwise, they spend the rest of their lives deep in burrows. As with many other species, destruction of ponds and habitats is making the gopher frog extremely rare in its normal range.
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Record #:
8799
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Many visitors to North Carolina's coastline exit their homes and pass through the sand dunes on their way to the beach without giving the dunes a second thought. Closer inspection would reveal life existing there, a tough life that works hard to make a living in the dunes day and night. Nickens discuses some of these creatures, including the ghost crab, sand wasp, red fox, royal tern, and Eastern glass lizard.
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Record #:
8798
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Hunting turkeys in North Carolina's mountains offers new challenges to flat-land hunters. Ingram discusses points to consider, including gaining access to hunting grounds; type of land features to look for; hunting in the big woods; and calling tactics.
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Record #:
8885
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Cornell discusses the rainbow trout's life history, habitat, importance as a game fish, and why there is no such thing as a typical rainbow trout.
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