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5 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 69 Issue 4, Apr 2005
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Record #:
7159
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Abstract:
Compared to the number of men who hunt and fish, few women participate in these activities. A major reason given by women for nonparticipation is their lack of early experience with the outdoors. By the time they get the urge as adults, the men in their lives who hunt and fish are far ahead of them in skills. Becoming an Outdoors Women (BOW) is a national outdoor skills program that provides women the opportunity to develop outdoor skills, including hunting, fishing, boating, and camping. The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission sponsors the program in the state. Martin relates her experiences as a program participant.
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Record #:
7149
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The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission has curtailed unauthorized activities at the 4,400-acre Needmore Game Land because of concerns over public safety and habitat degradation. The land lies in Swain and Macon Counties. Commission concerns were associated with unrestricted camping practices and reports of alcohol and drug abuse. Restrictions include prohibiting the use of all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) and prohibiting gathering of native plant materials.
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Record #:
7161
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Snowbird Cherokees in western North Carolina chose a trail planted with trees and medicinal herbs to honor the memory of tribal leaders, like Junaluska, who have passed down age-old traditions. The Medicine Trail is located outside Robbinsville. The nearly forty-five plants along the trail were selected for their role in the community's medicine traditions. Plants include Joe Pye weed, sourwood, yellowroot, and goldenseal.
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Record #:
7160
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Located ten miles south of Pittsboro in Chatham County, the 275-acre White Pines Preserve, a Triangle Land Conservancy property, is known for its isolated stand of white pines. The property is located on a promontory bounded by the confluence of the Rocky and Deep rivers. Lynch describes the area, which, for 10,000 years, has been a refuge for a collection of mountain, Piedmont, and coastal plains flora and fauna.
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Record #:
7150
Abstract:
In 2004, the mountain areas of North Carolina suffered flooding from three autumn hurricanes. While the Pigeon River and its tributaries and the Davidson River were severely affected by the flooding, most of the trout fishery in Western North Carolina escaped with minor damage.
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