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5 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 63 Issue 9, Sept 1999
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Record #:
4604
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Wisconsin Tissue plans to build a $180 million paper mill on the Roanoke River near Weldon are on hold. Chesapeake Corp. has decided to sell controlling interest in Wisconsin Tissue to Georgia-Pacific Corp. The hold is welcome news to environmentalists, biologists, and fishermen who questioned placing the mill on the river. The river's striped bass population was restored in 1997, and the mill's planned discharge of nine million gallons of wastewater per day had a potential impact on the river's resources.
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Record #:
4617
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A rule change by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission for the 1999-2000 hunting season required hunters to record their harvests on a Big Game Harvest Report Card instead of tagging wild turkey, bear, deer, and boar as in past seasons. The Division of Wildlife Management uses this data to determine a species population status before it sets bag limits for the next season.
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Record #:
4601
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One of the greatest and most influential conservation books ever published in the United States was published in 1949. The author was Aldo Leopold, and the book was A Sand County Almanac. Only Carson's Silent Spring and Thoreau's Walden are serious competitors. Wildlife biologists Pete Bromley and Phil Doerr discuss what Leopold's work says to citizens of North Carolina at the start of the twenty-first century.
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Record #:
4588
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William Bartram, son of the famous royal botanist, John Bartram, left Philadelphia in 1773 on a four-year botanizing expedition across the Southeast. The newly-opened, 81-mile Bartram Trail follows his path through the wilds of western North Carolina. Nickens describes his experiences hiking in Bartram's 200-year-old footsteps.
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Record #:
4600
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Of all the things needed to successfully hunt deer - shooting skill, equipment, outdoor knowledge - the most important is finding deer signs and being able to interpret them. Almy describes deer signs, including droppings, beds, tracks, feed areas, and rubs, and what they mean.
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