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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for Game--Laws and legislation
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Record #:
8206
Abstract:
Firelighting is a way of taking deer at night by aid of a light, usually a powerful flashlight or car spotlight. The firelighter takes advantage of the deer's night feeding habits and its tendency to be immobilized by a bright light. This method of hunting is illegal. The authors discuss the progress that is being made in bringing these violators to justice and the hazards firelighting creates for both violators and law enforcement officers.
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Record #:
8319
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Abstract:
Game laws in the 20th-century can sometimes be confusing with their many exceptions and special regulations. Compared to the state's hunting laws in 1915, however, today's laws are simpler. Fields examines the 1915 Synopsis of the Game Laws of Counties in North Carolina, Under Jurisdiction of the State Audubon Society, So Far As They Apply to the Counties Wherein the State Game Wardens Have Authority for Enforcing the Bird and Game Protective Laws to give readers a look at the hunting laws of fifty years ago. Killing a mockingbird in Edgecombe County, for example, could cost the perpetrator a fine of not more than $50 or imprisonment not exceeding 30 days.
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Record #:
10
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Originated by sportsmen, national wildlife refuges face a proposed ban on hunting that could threaten the entire refuge system.
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Record #:
2458
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In 1996-97, state sportsmen hunting migratory birds must have a Migratory Bird Harvest Information Permit. Data will allow state and federal wildlife agencies to monitor more exactly the yearly fowl harvest and to manage wildlife resources better.
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Record #:
3913
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Poaching, or hunting game animals illegally, is a serious problem, with 621 arrests for night hunting in 1997 alone. Most hunters obey the law, but the few violators not only destroy wildlife but also endanger citizens and the N.C. Wildlife Commission officers who enforce the law.
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Record #:
4617
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A rule change by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission for the 1999-2000 hunting season required hunters to record their harvests on a Big Game Harvest Report Card instead of tagging wild turkey, bear, deer, and boar as in past seasons. The Division of Wildlife Management uses this data to determine a species population status before it sets bag limits for the next season.
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Record #:
38764
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Abstract:
This is a progress report on the activities of Federal Aid Project 25-D, which was created in 1948 to solve the problem of diminishing small game animals.