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8 results for The State Vol. 54 Issue 3, Aug 1986
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Record #:
7745
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Abstract:
By the spring of 1862, Eastern North Carolina was already feeling the effects of the Civil War. Coastal fortifications at Washington, Plymouth, and New Bern were under federal occupation. Confederate forces still maintained control of the entire area west of Greenville, Kinston, Goldsboro, and Wilmington. The area between the U.S. and Confederate occupied areas suffered greatly. In November 1862, Major General John G. Foster, U.S.A., received orders to attack Confederate regiments in Martin County. Considered to be just as devastating as Sherman's march through Georgia, Foster's Raid covered about ninety-four miles in Martin County. Over two million dollars worth of property damage was done and nothing of military value was accomplished.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 3, Aug 1986, p8-11, il, map
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Record #:
7747
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W.O. Saunders, newspaper publisher and editor of the Elizabeth City THE INDEPENDENT, was a leading advocate for identifying North Carolina as the birthplace of English civilization in America and of aviation in the world. Saunders predicted that the Outer Banks would be a tourist destination if bridges were built over the inlets. He also wrote the play “The Lost Colony,” which would be performed for years to come on Roanoke Island. During his lifetime, Saunders was never recognized for these visions. Walking the streets of Elizabeth City and New York in pajamas to protest the practice of wearing three piece suits in the summer, however, did not go unnoticed.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 3, Aug 1986, p17-19, il
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Record #:
7746
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Long before the days of million dollar contracts, press agents, and television coverage, baseball was played for fun at East Monbo Park. The park was located in Iredell County between Statesville and Mooresville near a cotton mill in the early part of the 20th-century. Workers were permitted to watch the games, which were played at five o'clock in the afternoon during the week and one o'clock on Saturdays as long as someone stayed behind to keep an eye on the machines. By 1986, the park was completely under Lake Norman, but the memory of the terrific baseball played there will live on.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 3, Aug 1986, p7, 37
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Record #:
7750
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Just south of Hendersonville, North Carolina, is the former residence of Pulitzer Prize winner Carl Sandburg. The house sits on a 240-acre farm on the side of a mountain in the Blue Ridge foothills. Built in 1838, the house has a high porch and is constructed of white clapboard. Sandburg's wife, Paula, raised goats as a hobby. The farm is the only National Historic Site of its kind. Visitors can take twenty-minute tours of the house with the accompaniment of the National Park Service guide. Here, they can see how the famous writer created such master pieces as the biography of Abraham Lincoln and his “Complete Poems” on a typewriter which sat on an orange crate.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 3, Aug 1986, p12-13, il
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Record #:
7756
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During the Great Depression, North Carolina families found an inexpensive form of entertainment in the radio. Every weekday afternoon the program “It's Briarhopper Time” aired, which featured country and gospel songs and novelty numbers. The program lasted through World War II and popular singers and movies stars made appearances, including Claude Casey and Whitney and Hogan. “It's Briarhopper Time” was still playing when the article was written in 1986, and was more popular than ever. The original members of the program, who were in their seventies, made appearances all over the United States and Europe. Their unique style of country music endured the cultural changes of a century.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 3, Aug 1986, p26-27, il
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Record #:
7749
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Freedom Hill Wesleyan Church was built in 1848 near Snow Camp, when it was part of Chatham County. Freedom Hill was the first Wesleyan Methodist Church in the South. The people of Snow Camp harassed the church with musket fire because of its anti-slavery doctrine. Twelve bullet scars from are still on the doors of the church. The Wesleyan's remained steadfast in their beliefs. The church was moved to the Wesleyan Camp Grounds in Colfax, in western Guilford County in 1976.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 3, Aug 1986, p21, 38, il
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Record #:
7748
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A 6,000 square foot museum to preserve the memory of tobacco farm life was established in Kenly. The museum houses collections which range from quilts to farm equipment. Admission is free.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 3, Aug 1986, p22-23, il
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Record #:
7762
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At Shallotte Point, North Carolina, the Annual Poor Boy Shark Tournament is held for three days each year. It is the only shark fishing tournament held in North Carolina. In its fifth year, the tournament hosted 35 boats, and 118 fishermen who caught 87 sharks. Participants are warned of the dangerous that come with hunting shark, but they love the competition and of course, the food.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 3, Aug 1986, p24-25, il
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