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10 results for The State Vol. 42 Issue 9, Feb 1975
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Record #:
9386
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John White, the second Caucasian artist in America, was an explorer and competent mapmaker commissioned by Sir Walter Raleigh to publicize the new domain of Queen Elizabeth. In 1585 White painted many landscapes, fauna and floral studies, and scenes of the daily lives of the Native Americans.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Feb 1975, p9-11, il
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Record #:
9387
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Before signing with the Yankees on New Year's Eve, Jim “Catfish” Hunter's team of “country lawyers” and the small town of Ahoskie received many high profile visitors from the world of major league baseball, including famed singing cowboy and San Diego Padres' owner, Gene Autry.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Feb 1975, p12, il
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Record #:
9394
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Colonel George Kirk organized and commanded North Carolina Union Cavalry regiments in Burnsville finding Union sentiment high in mountain counties for the lack of slave holders. Kirk's ruthless raids in the Blue Ridge Mountains proved integral in diverting attention from main Union forces of Stoneman and Sherman.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Feb 1975, p19, 37, il
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Record #:
9391
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The scuppernong has been the favored for winemaking in the south since 1584 when a Roanoke colonists recorded the grapes' abundance. The grape is now going commercial from Chowan County, at Wine Cellars, Inc., North Carolina's only winery.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Feb 1975, p17, il
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Record #:
9395
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Brushy Mountain apple grower Edith Bentley claims the apples from the Bentley homestead located at the foot of Sugarloaf have a distinct taste more appealing than apples from Virginia. She and her husband have been partners growing and selling apples and making cider since their marriage in 1932.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Feb 1975, p23, il, por
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Record #:
9393
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Journalist, thinker, and Presidential advisor, Walter Lippmann died December 14, 1974. His early talks in North Carolina though ever-current are often overlooked when his career is considered retrospectively.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Feb 1975, p18
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Record #:
9392
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Sold under the brand name “Deerfield Vineyards,” Edenton's Wine Cellars, Inc. once had the distinction of being North Carolina's only legal winery. The 83-acre vineyard grows the sweet scuppernong grapes that yield a light, dry table wine.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Feb 1975, p17-18, il
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Record #:
9390
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Aunt Betsy Brewington died at the age of 109 on May 6, 1974. Brewington was purportedly the last person living to have been born into slavery in North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Feb 1975, p16
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Record #:
9388
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Pete Harmatuk has amassed thousands of prehistoric fossils from scouring the beds of the Neuse River. Harmatuk has developed a regular voluntary working relationship with the Smithsonian and freely donates many of his finds to the museum.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Feb 1975, p13, 32, il, por
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Record #:
9389
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The small coastal North Carolina village of Hampstead holds the largely attended Hampstead Oyster Roasts to raise money for various facets of the community. The all-you-can-eat roasts are held on the first Saturdays of the winter months.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Feb 1975, p14-16, il
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