NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


20 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. Vol. 46 Issue No. 2,
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
36596
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author talks about the long history of pork barbecue, different sauces in different parts of the State, pig pickins, early barbecue restaurants, and the Lexington Barbecue Festival, which draws one hundred thousand people each October.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 46 Issue No. 2, , p32-33, il
Record #:
36597
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author talks about the four black men who performed the sit-in at Woolworth’s lunch counter in Greensboro, NC, which led to six months of lunch counter protests across the South and the end of racial segregation in restaurants.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 46 Issue No. 2, , p34-35, il
Record #:
36598
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author talks about so much food we have grown in North Carolina for centuries is from Africa and other places. With new North Carolinians from other countries, new foodways and culinary choices are available.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 46 Issue No. 2, , p36-37, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
36591
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author talks about the many types of apples found in North Carolina and their different uses. Many old time or ‘heirloom’ apples have disappeared; but apple historians are finding examples and bringing them back into production. There is a place that is has an heirloom apple collection open to the public called ‘Horne Creek Living Historical Farm’ located in Pinnacle, NC, north of Winston-Salem.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 46 Issue No. 2, , p22-24, il
Record #:
36592
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author talks about the creation of the CMA (Colored Merchants Association) in Winston-Salem, NC, which tried to help the small black independent grocery stores to compete with Chain Stores by using group buying power to match the lower prices the Chain Stores. It worked for a while until the Depression closed many stores.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 46 Issue No. 2, , p25-26, il
Record #:
36594
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author talks about the career of Jane S. McKimmon in the creation of 4H clubs to help farm women in modern food preservation and her County Extension work.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 46 Issue No. 2, , p28-30, il
Record #:
36593
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author talks about her food memories and the difference in preservation that changed the taste of food from her early days.
Source:
Record #:
36590
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author talks about all the old methods of food preservation.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 46 Issue No. 2, , p20-21, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
36595
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author talks about how food has played a role in our religious life.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
36526
Author(s):
Abstract:
Shortages , Substitutes, and Salt: Food during the Civil War in North Carolina The author talks of the suffering and hardships from the lack of food in North Carolina during the Civil War. He uses Civil War letters to demonstrate the lack of food for the soldiers.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 46 Issue No. 2, , p14-16, il
Record #:
36520
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author gives the history of such foods as corn, popcorn, peanuts, potatoes, molasses, pigeons, ketchup, opossum, mustard greens and chocolate. She talks about how our North Carolina ancestors ate seasonal food.
Source:
Record #:
36522
Abstract:
The authors talks about archaeologists finding evidence of what kinds of food that Indians had.
Source:
Record #:
36521
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author using journals of the Moravian settlers from the 1700s, gives what kinds of food they grew and ate.
Source:
Record #:
36528
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author talks of learning to read old writing when the writer writes his words as they sound. Reading historical records can be much like breaking a code. An example of entries from a 1795 journal from western North Carolina is given to translate.
Source:
Subject(s):