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13 results for Our State Vol. 72 Issue 12, May 2005
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Record #:
7174
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Abstract:
Harnett County native General William C. Lee earned the title of “Father of the Airborne,” for his pioneer work in developing the Army's paratrooper program. Having seen paratroopers in foreign countries, General Lee worked hard during the 1930s and 1940s to convince the U.S. military to develop a fighting paratrooper program. He was successful. On the night of June 5, 1944, 10,000 paratroopers of the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions parachuted into France at the start of the Normandy Invasion. General Lee was not among them, having suffered a heart attack in April, but as each trooper jumped, he shouted, \"Bill Lee!\"
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 12, May 2005, p24-27, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7173
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Apex was one of the first towns to develop around Raleigh. The town incorporated in 1873. Because it was the highest point on the Chatham Railroad between Richmond and Jacksonville, Florida, it took the name of Apex. The town prospered until 1911, when a fire destroyed most of the business district. Restoration brought most of the sixty commercial buildings and homes in the fire-damaged section back to life and they now attract many visitors with unique shops and restaurants. Not only history but also natural surroundings are emphasized, and the city boasts nine parks linked by greenways. The town has grown from 5,000 residents in 1990 to 30,000 today, with the numbers expected to double in the next decade.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 12, May 2005, p18-20, 22-23, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
7171
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The Greater Charlotte Sports Hall of Fame honors the city's sports heroes. For membership honorees must be at least 50 years old, have distinguished themselves through their exemplary sports achievements and good character, and either be from the Charlotte-Mecklenburg region or have resided there at least ten years. The eight members of the hall of fame are David Thompson (basketball); Floyd Mason Simmons, Jr. (track); Dale Earnhardt (NASCAR racing); Bobby Jones (basketball); Jeff Mullins (basketball); Jim Beatty (track); Hoyt Wilhelm (professional baseball).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 12, May 2005, p44-46, 48, 50, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7180
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The 1960s in North Carolina were a tumultuous period. The civil rights movement had taken root with the Greensboro sit-ins. Racial tensions were high across the state, and riots, sit-ins, and demonstrations on streets and in businesses were common. Against this background of unrest, Jim Williams, owner of Turnage's Barbecue Place in Durham, made the decision to integrate his restaurant in May 1963. It was the first Durham restaurant to integrate. Williams also talked the owners of The Blue Light and Rebel Drive Inn into joining him. Warren recounts Williams's life and the historic moment in Durham.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 12, May 2005, p30-32, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7181
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On an August evening in 1788, outside the town of Jonesborough (which was then inside the borders of North Carolina), two men faced each other with pistols in hand, ready to fight a duel. Waightstill Avery, one of western North Carolina's most prominent lawyers and citizens, was one of the men. Andrew Jackson was the other. A courtroom altercation had brought both men to the town's outskirts. Coffey recounts the events leading to the duel and the duel itself.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 12, May 2005, p34-36, 38, 40, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7193
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William Henry Chase Whiting, a brilliant engineer and West Point graduate in the class of 1845, designed and oversaw the construction of the Cape Lookout Lighthouse. He finished the structure in the fall of 1859. The light flashed for the first time on November 1, 1859, just a few days after John Brown's attack at Harper's Ferry. At the outbreak of war, Whiting joined the Confederate Army and in 1862 was promoted to brigadier general. He was mortally wounded in 1865, during the massive assault by Union forces on Fort Fisher outside Wilmington. Whiting's design was so successful that after the Civil War three other lighthouses in the state - Cape Hatteras, Bodie Island, and Currituck Beach - followed its design.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 12, May 2005, p106-109, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7192
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The Hill-Jones Octagon House in Cedar Point near Swansboro stands on a 60-acre tract of land. The house was donated to the Masons in 2001 by descendants of the original builders. The 5,000-square-foot house, built in 1856, has eight pie-shaped rooms and four square rooms. The house was headquarters for the Union Army during the Civil War. In 1996, two hurricanes took off the roof and severely damaged the interior. Then woodpeckers invaded. The Masons are currently restoring the house. In time they will build a summer camp on the grounds for the children's home they support in Oxford and later a village for retired Masons.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 12, May 2005, p102-105, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7190
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Strong storms of the late 1800s and the high winds and flooding of the Great Storm of 1898 drove residents of Shackleford Banks from their homes forever. Survivors migrated to Morehead City, Harkers Island, or Bogue Banks, where some built new homes and continued their community traditions. Some brought their houses with them, floating them from Shackleford Banks on sail skiffs, rafts, and other modes of water transportation. Today some of these moved structures stand in a section of Morehead City called Promise Land. The historic buildings are identified by markers from the Carteret County Historical Association.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 12, May 2005, p92-94, 96, il Periodical Website
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7189
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The Frisco Native American Museum, located on Hatteras Island at Frisco, is a labor of love for Carl and Joyce Bornfriend. When he was nine years old, Carl began collecting Native American artifacts in his native Pennsylvania. When he moved to the Outer Banks to teach in the early 1980s, he brought with him his collection of 100,000-plus items from many tribes. He has continued collecting, and now displays the artifacts in a small, very cramped museum. His efforts to preserve Native American relics have earned him high praise from Native Americans, and the Lenni Lenape Indians of Pennsylvania adopted him into their tribe.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 12, May 2005, p86-88, 90, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7194
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In 1837, Mike Harmon's great-great-grandfather James Cash Goodwin left England to seek his fortune in America as a weaver. His ship sank in the North Sea, but a passing ship pulled him and a trunk full of his family's weaving patterns from the icy waters. Today, Harmon, a sixth generation weaver, along with his wife Dena and family, continues a weaving tradition of over two centuries. The Buffalo Creek Weavers in Ashe County weave bedspreads on a century-old loom. The rare colonial patterns on the spreads date back to the early 1700s.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 12, May 2005, p190-192, 194-195, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7188
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The annual Rogallo Kite Festival, held for the past twenty-three years at Jockey's Ridge State Park in Nags Head, honors Francis and Gertrude Rogallo. A NASA engineer, Rogallo, along with his wife, is credited with inventing the flexible wing in 1948. In the 1960s, use of the wing launched the sport of hang gliding. Since 1974, Kitty Hawk Kites has instructed over 300,000 people in the techniques of hang gliding.
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7191
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Oriental, a town of 900 residents and 3,000 boats, well deserves the title of Sailing Capital of North Carolina. The Oriental School of Sailing, founded there in 1979, is one of more than a dozen sailing schools in North Carolina and is the state's oldest. Classes range from basic keelboat sailing to bareboat chartering and coastal navigation. There are four days of instruction, including about nine classroom hours and the remainder of the time spent on the water.
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Record #:
7187
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In Currituck County, between Corolla and the Virginia border, around sixty wild horses roam free. They are the descendants of Spanish mustangs and have survived the fierce weather of the Outer Banks for over 400 years. In 1984, construction of a road has brought tourists and permanent homes to the area. By 1989, eleven horses had been killed along the highway. Westbrook discusses how contact between traffic and horses might be decreased.
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