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8 results for Our State Vol. 68 Issue 2, July 2000
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4669
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W. T. Couch became part-time assistant director of the University of North Carolina Press in 1925. In 1927, through his efforts, the Congaree Sketches, with an emotional introduction by Paul Green, was published, and the press's publishing direction of excessive caution and conservatism was forever changed. The press would move forward as a leader in launching Modernist thought in the South during the 1920s and 1930s. Couch believed that it was important \"to bother people, to wake them up,\" and he followed this thought during his twenty years as director of the UNC Press.
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4671
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North Carolina artist Ben Long is a master of the ancient art form of fresco painting, one of the most demanding and unforgiving mediums in which to work. Long has painted frescoes in New York, France, and Italy, and over the last twenty years created a number in his home state. His newest work is \"The Return of the Prodigal,\" painted on a wall of the Chapel of the Prodigal at Montreat College.
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4670
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The timber rattlesnake is an important part of the forest ecosystem. Loss of habitat through development reduces its numbers. The snake also has an undeserved reputation as a creature to be feared. People encountering it often kill it, when all the snake wants is to avoid people. Herpetologist John Sealy discusses positive values of the rattlesnake and why it should be protected.
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4675
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Randolph County at 790 square miles and 125,000 people of one of the state's largest counties. It is the sixth most industrialized county, with manufacturing accounting for 46 percent of the industry. The county boasts the nation's largest walk-through natural habitat zoo at Asheboro. Although large and forward-looking, the county preserves its history with Seagrove pottery, dating from the 1700s; the historic 1909 courthouse; and 1911 covered bridge in Union township, one of only a few remaining in the state.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 2, July 2000, p88-90, 92, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4674
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In the Black Mountain range in Yancy County stand six of the tallest peaks east of the Rocky Mountains. All exceed 6,500 feet. The tallest is Mt. Mitchell, at 6,684 feet, which is also the tallest in eastern North America. Named for its early explorer, Elisha Mitchell, the peak is a place of great beauty and weather extremes. Currently the mountain's Fraser firs are dying from an imported European pest and acid rain and fog. Development is slowly creeping in upon the mountain, also.
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4673
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Many areas of the stare are so well-lit through growth and development that stargazing is difficult. There are areas, however, where light pollution doesn't reach, like country lanes, mountain tops, and parts of the Outer Banks. Yocum includes a list of North Carolina cities with planetariums where one can learn basic astronomy and the names of a number of astronomical clubs in the state.
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4672
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Mountain biking has grown considerably since the 1970s. Bikers are attracted to the challenge of a steep slope, negotiating tree roots and rocks on the trails, freedom from cars and dogs, and outstanding summit views. South Mountain State Park, Tsali National Recreation Area, and Pisgah National Forest are some of the favored areas of mountain bikers.
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4676
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At the mouth of the Cape Fear River sits the small town of Southport. Grizzle describes how to spend a perfect weekend there, enjoying nature, history, and especially the great seafood.
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