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5 results for North Carolina Naturalist Vol. 24 Issue 4, Fall 2016
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Record #:
34617
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, along with the Wildlife Resources Commission and NC State University, have developed a new animal tracking program called Candid Critters. The objective is for citizens to place camera traps on approved public lands in order to capture photographs of the flora and fauna. This will help track animal behavior, migration, and more. By March 2017, they plan to have the program in all 100 counties.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 24 Issue 4, Fall 2016, p6, il
Record #:
35382
Author(s):
Abstract:
Art and science interconnect with the work done by Joana Ricou. As Carla Burgess revealed, samples of microbes Ricou took from belly buttons (what she dubbed “the other self”). Through these samples, Ricou was hoping to understand how the microbial world inhabiting human beings shapes their identities. Samples slide images became a group selfie that contained microbes from two dozen plus participants.
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Record #:
35383
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Abstract:
Trey Lee and authors from ScienceX Magazine were among the producers of this issue’s articles. Two studied microbes’ impact on humans and humans’ impact on endangered species such as freshwater mussels and Raleigh’s Umstead State Park’s wildlife. Two others discussed taxonomy and remains of two WWII marine vessels. Three profiled honeybees, deep diving birds like the gannet, and a program teaching natural science to special populations
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 24 Issue 4, Fall 2016, p7-10
Record #:
35384
Author(s):
Abstract:
Examples of Dino bling, according to new research from the NC Museum of Natural Sciences, were the bony crests, horns, and knobs that may have served mating, territory, or defense purposes. Speculated also, according to author Tracey Peake, was a correlation between the shrinking bodies of dinosaurs and the disappearance of crests, horns, and knobs in favor of feathers.
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Record #:
35381
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Abstract:
This article, which discussed the "Secret World Inside You" March 2017 exhibit, revealed the secret world as inhabited by microbes. It’s a vast world, when considering the ratio of microbes to human cells. It’s also a vital world. In this article, the author considered the role microbes play in human survival in terms how the digestive tract, immune system, and brain function with their assistance.
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