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4 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 41 Issue 3, July 1964
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20622
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Educational reform was a major component of early 20th century Democratic political campaigns with men like Governor Charles B. Aycock leading the way. Working with Aycock, Charles McIver was a crucial figure in developing legislature to include education for African Americans despite popular opinion of the time. McIver was president of the Industrial College in Greensboro and believed in education for African Americans if not completely equal education. These opinions are expressed in a series of letters between himself and his political allies which are reprinted in this article.
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20620
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The state militia began with a charter in 1663 allowing the eight Lords Proprietors of Carolina to enlist and train a force for the defensive purposes. Militia was to defend early North Carolinians from Native Americans, pirates along the coast, and England's European foes, especially the Spanish. From this initial act the author describes the history of the state's militia, statistics concerning recruitment, and the legislative measures to both form and maintain the state's defensive force through the 18th century.
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Record #:
20623
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Tobacco prices were greatly affected by both the Depression and the overproduction in 1933. Governor John Christoph Blucher Ehringhaus became an instrumental figure in unifying the state's tobacco growers in an effort to regulate and reduce production so that costs would go up. The author describes Governor Ehringhaus' efforts to restore the state's tobacco market through both state and national legislation.
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Record #:
20621
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Thomas Hart was a prominent businessman in 18th century Orange County. He served both Hillsboro and Orange County in a number of ways from political, to business, religion, and through military service. The author recounts Hart's service to the community from his move from Virginia to his service as Sheriff and later as the Captain of the Orange County Militia.
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