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8 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 50 Issue 1-2, Fall-Winter 2003
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Record #:
5933
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tommy Thompson died January 24, 2003. He was an old-time music legend, founding member of the Chapel Hill string band, The Red Clay Ramblers, and beloved singer, songwriter, banjo player, playwright, and actor. Thompson received a 1995 Brown-Hudson Folklore Award for his music compositions and for preservation and performance of traditional songs.
Record #:
36361
Author(s):
Abstract:
In historically African American colleges and universities, the marching bands are immensely popular with spectators. The bands combine music, drilling, dance, showmanship, and pageantry in a way that speaks to the values and aesthetics of African American culture.
Record #:
36363
Abstract:
Typical yard displays for many homes around Christmas time include nativity scenes combined with characters from cultural figures, such as Santa, frosty the snowman, and Disney characters.
Record #:
36359
Author(s):
Abstract:
In memorium to Ray Hicks, the authors recall his famous storytelling abilities, especially regarding jack tales.
Record #:
36367
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mardi Gras in Louisiana is a grand experience to be a part of. All communities have various features that are individualistic to them and common to all, such as costumes.
Subject(s):
Record #:
36383
Abstract:
The Farmer-James collection of quilts was a traveling exhibit from January 20-March 14, 2003. It included 37 quilts ranging from Civil War era to the mid-twentieth century. It showcases the difference between folkloristic and artistic treatments of quilt making traditions.
Record #:
36380
Abstract:
Different patterns on quilts made by African Americans used to be a form of communication in the Underground Railroad. Ten to twelve different patterns were used to inform fugitive slaves as to what their next action should be. Although quilting patterns are no longer used for these purposes, patterns are still very important within African American quilting communities.