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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for African American universities and colleges
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Record #:
11627
Author(s):
Abstract:
On December 27, 1892, in a remote pasture near Salisbury, in the cold and snow, Johnson C. Smith University (then Biddle Memorial Institute) and Livingstone College played the first football game between historically black colleges. This game laid the groundwork for black college football. Today, nine historically African American schools in North Carolina have football programs.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 5, Oct 2009, p62-64, 66-67, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
11950
Abstract:
North Carolina's historically black colleges and universities range from small, private, four-year liberal arts colleges with enrollment in the hundreds to large public ones with enrollment in the thousands that offer a full range of program leading to doctoral degrees. Witherspoon provides a brief summary of each of the eleven schools.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 42 Issue 2, Feb 2010, p16-19, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
14106
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Abstract:
Bennett College, in Greensboro has established a remarkable record in educational work among Negro girls of this and many other states, as well as foreign countries.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 8, July 1949, p8-9, f
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Record #:
24777
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rosalind Fuse-Hall, president of Bennett College in Greensboro discusses the importance of historically black colleges and universities (HBCU). Although many HBCUs struggle with decreasing enrollment, their rich history and traditions are vital to the world of higher education.
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Record #:
36361
Author(s):
Abstract:
In historically African American colleges and universities, the marching bands are immensely popular with spectators. The bands combine music, drilling, dance, showmanship, and pageantry in a way that speaks to the values and aesthetics of African American culture.