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7 results for Wars--North Carolina--Citizen participation
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Record #:
19099
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hendricks compiles some interesting facts and figures in connection with the wars North Carolina's men and women have participated in, including the Revolutionary War, War of 1812, Mexican War, Civil War, Spanish-American War, World War I, and World War II.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 7, July 1943, p1-2, 24
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Record #:
24873
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between the end of royal government and the creation of the Provincial Congress of North Carolina, local committees of safety assumed roles of provisional governance. When other locals disagreed with or criticized the actions taken by the new committees, serious consequences could occur. One example is provided by the response taken in New Hanover County by the Wilmington Safety Committee to the so-called “Musquetoe,” a scandalous set of hand-drawn and privately circulated caricatures of members of safety committees in the Lower Cape Fear.
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Record #:
28122
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the fifth anniversary of the Iraq invasion, Fayetteville area soldiers and peace activists speak about the protest movement. The response to anti-war protests has declined as many people have become tired of protesting. Many soldiers and citizens are against the war, but afraid to speak out. Additionally, anti-war groups are broadening their focus, paying attention to homelessness and race relations in an effort to attract more supporters and minorities. Also, absent from the protesting groups in the state are veterans.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 13, March 2008, p5-7 Periodical Website
Record #:
28124
Abstract:
A photojournal marks the fifth anniversary of the Iraq War. The photographs are presented to honor the fallen soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan and to illustrate the conflicting emotions about war.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 13, March 2008, p36-37 Periodical Website
Record #:
28914
Author(s):
Abstract:
During World War I, North Carolinians were affected in many ways. Men, women, and children stepped up to help out the cause in a variety of ways. Many joined the war effort as soldiers, bases were created in Fayetteville, Raleigh, Charlotte, and Hillsborough, people bought war bonds, children were encouraged to help garden, women joined organizations like the Red Cross, and North Carolina’s wartime industry brought jobs and money to the state.
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Record #:
28916
Author(s):
Abstract:
The impact the Women’s Land Army of America had on the war effort during World War I is detailed. The idea for the group originally started in Great Britain before being adopted in America. The group encouraged women known as “farmerettes” to volunteer by helping plant, grow, or harvest crops during the war. This group helped the Suffrage Movement and the history of the group before, during, and after the war is detailed.
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Record #:
35427
Author(s):
Abstract:
Historical events, whether it’s of the national or personal nature, were featured in the quintet of recollections that spanned from the depths of WWII to the 1970s. The historical event included in one story was the surrender of the Japanese in September 1945. As for personal historical significance, they ranged from a special wedding gift to acts of generosity that makes the belief in Southern Hospitality ring true.