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6 results for Shipbuilding
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Record #:
21628
Abstract:
This article examines the how the shipbuilding industry helped rejuvenate the economy of North Carolina during World War II. Wooden shipbuilding in particular was already established at several small facilities within the state. Through these facilities, 148 wooden vessels were built in North Carolina that saw service in World War II.
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Record #:
21621
Abstract:
During the Civil War, Confederate attempts to build ironclads in Wilmington failed because of shortages in skilled labor and materials needed for construction. The Wilmington facilities were more than acceptable for ironclad construction but shortages in oakum, seasoned timber, and metal plate as well as the necessary woodworkers and metalworkers, doomed Confederate efforts.
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Record #:
9765
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Abstract:
Over one 100 years ago, wooden boats used along North Carolina's coasts and in the sounds followed a time-tested pattern. Many of them, including the sharpie, shad boat, and spritsail skiff, are being revived in the 20th-century by people who want to fish from a vessel that is part of the state's maritime heritage.
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Record #:
36017
Abstract:
She was designed as a Bicentennial project, bearing a brand of authenticity in its fifteen stars and stripes flag. However, this sailing vessel still may have been a point of pride, since clipper ships had played an important role in America the past two centuries, notably during the war of 1812.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1981, p35-38
Record #:
14760
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Abstract:
John Henry Louis Mogg, an Australian native, became an American citizen between the World Wars and began a fruitful diving career. Companies along the eastern seaboard commissioned him, but he spent a great deal of time in North Carolina. When a project on the Pamlico River near Washington became available, Mogg was the sole diver responsible for all underwater construction on the marine railway. The marine railway serviced Gahagan Construction Company which was commissioned to launch upwards of 30 wooden barges; the purpose of which to haul crude oil along the Inland Waterway.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 1, June 1943, p3-4, 39, por
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Record #:
37723
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Abstract:
The article deals with shallow vessels like canoes, perriaugers, sloops, sharpies and early shipbuilding in North Carolina.
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