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11 results for Aycock, Charles Brantley, 1859-1912
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Record #:
3381
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Charles B. Aycock State Historic Site in Wayne County honors the state's education governor. Among his accomplishments were raising school appropriations, state textbook adoptions, and creation of 877 rural school libraries.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 57 Issue 11, Apr 1990, p13-15, il, por
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Record #:
12034
Author(s):
Abstract:
The new chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, William Brantley Aycock, is replacing Robert B. House after twelve years of service. A distinguished and decorated war veteran, Aycock is slated to run as a gubernatorial candidate in upcoming elections.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 4, July 1957, p15, por
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Record #:
12193
Abstract:
November of next year will mark the 100th year since the birth of Charles B. Aycock; and if all goes well, it will mark the opening of a new and historic attraction for North Carolinians in the form of his restored birthplace. The architect's drawings of the restored house of North Carolina's great educational governor bring the restoration one step closer to completion. Funds for this project were provided by the General assembly and by a public subscription drive.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 7, Sept 1958, p35, il
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Record #:
12754
Author(s):
Abstract:
Francis V. Kughler discusses the design and creation of his ninth mural Crusade for Education. The mural, created for the Institute of Government building in Chapel Hill, represents Governor Aycock of North Carolina addressing an audience in the state capital in his crusade for education ca. 1900. Kughler discusses his historical research, and the study of human subjects which aided in the creation of his latest work.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 18, Feb 1962, p8
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Record #:
13419
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charles Brantley Aycock went further than he dreamed. As governor of North Carolina he led the state to undertake a crusade for public education.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 25, Nov 1953, p6-7, f
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Record #:
14576
Author(s):
Abstract:
Edens writes about a political rally she attended as a child in the summer of 1900. Politician Governor Aycock was scheduled to stop in Lumberton on his train ride campaign. The author recalls details of the procession and the pomp of the ceremony before the governor's arrival but little of the actual political speech delivered.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 10, Aug 1946, p3, 19
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Record #:
19539
Abstract:
Doctor Alderman, President of the University of Virginia, gave a memorial address at the unveiling of the Aycock statue in Raleigh. Recounted here by Dr. Alderman is the Governor's beloved reputation across the state and some of Alderman's personal anecdotes from encounters with the Governor Aycock both before and during office.
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Record #:
19540
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Abstract:
Daniels' address delivered at the Aycock Memorial Ceremony offers a biographical sketch of the former governor -- from his childhood to his death on April 4, 1912. The author discusses Governor Aycock's family, education, early career, and eventual role as state governor.
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Record #:
21000
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article looks at the five years of educational change that preceded Gov. Charles B. Aycock's election in 1900, specifically at the forces that helped make his reforms possible and which largely set the tone and nature of the educational changes he sought.
Record #:
35579
Author(s):
Abstract:
The historic trail of Eastern NC, covering towns such as Fayetteville and Windsor, was a road with plenty of landmarks. Contained for the tourists’ consideration were many of the state’s acre bound treasures—over two thirds, according to the author. Examples of these historic properties were Charles B. Aycock’s birthplace and the James Iredell House.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 4, Aug/Sept 1973, p30-31
Record #:
36050
Author(s):
Abstract:
The menagerie of movers and shakers in Greenville were profiled in this snapshot in words of how East Carolina University came to be. Accompanying the snapshot in words was a copy of the actual snapshot assembling those twenty-two individuals, taken on July 2, 1908.