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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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18 results for "Waste management"
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Record #:
29093
Author(s):
Abstract:
United States Representative David Price, a Democrat who represents Wake and Orange counties, is trying to improve environmental standards for North Carolina’s hog industry. In late May, Price introduced a bill called the Swine Act, which would encourage the development, certification, and adoption of environmentally sustainable waste-management technologies.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 26, July 2017, p8, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27714
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Mining and Energy Commission will make some changes to regulations after receiving over 200,000 public comments. The buffer zone between drill sites and drinking water may increase and unannounced inspections may occur at drill sites. One notable change will not be made. Fracking waste will be stored in open-pit ponds despite the risks of leakage and environmental contamination.
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Record #:
25497
Author(s):
Abstract:
Steve Wing is an associate professor of epidemiology at UNC. Since 1995, Wing has been studying hog farming communities, waste management and its environmental effects. An important focus of his research is the proximity of hog waste lagoons to drinking water and residential areas. His research suggests that hog farming is linked to pollution and local health issues.
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Record #:
34333
Author(s):
Abstract:
A pending change in Natural Resources Conservation Service standards for designing nutrient management plans for animal waste operations could force some animal producers in North Carolina to look for additional land on which to apply wastes. The unfavorable nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratio in manures has often resulted in an overapplication of phosphorus, which can further dissolve in soil water and seep into groundwater. North Carolina is identifying soil sites with high potential for phosphorus loss.
Record #:
34261
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located about eight miles south of the North Carolina State University campus in Raleigh are the new facilities of the Animal and Poultry Waste Management Center. The university and its partners are building and equipping waste processing and composting buildings that will help to find solutions to environmental problems associated with animal agriculture. New research, products, and technology hold promise for controlling odor and nutrient output.
Record #:
34251
Author(s):
Abstract:
As the swine industry continues to expand in North Carolina, questions have arisen about the ability of current animal waste management practices to protect surface waters from pollution by nitrogen from increasing volumes of swine waste. Dr. Stephen Whalen of the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill is conducting research aimed at identifying best management practices that will promote the conversion of complex nitrogen compounds in swine waste to benign dinitrogen gas.
Record #:
34248
Author(s):
Abstract:
On May 1, the North Carolina Soil and Water Conservation Commission adopted new technical standards for animal waste systems. Changes to the standards include the requirements that all future lagoons have emergency spillways, all lagoons be precharged, a trench be dug to investigate for tile drains, and liners be continually inspected to insure proper compaction and permeability.
Record #:
34215
Author(s):
Abstract:
In December 1992, the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission adopted revisions to rules governing waste treatment systems that do not discharge to surface waters. The rules require that animal production operations above specified sizes file with the Division of Environmental Management certification that they have obtained and implemented approved plans for managing their waste.
Record #:
34219
Author(s):
Abstract:
At its May 19 meeting, the North Carolina Soil and Water Conservation Commission approved sending to public hearing procedures and guidelines for implementing the “nondischarge” rules for animal waste systems. The commission was directed to adopt implementation rules after swine producers objected to proposed procedures that would have allowed local Soil and Water Conservation District Boards to certify animal waste management plans.
Record #:
34213
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Agricultural Cost Share Program helped install twice as many animal waste management structures in 1992 as it had in any previous year. The increase can be attributed to farmers anticipating implementation of new nondischarge regulations, and pressure on farmers to make their animal operations environmentally sound.
Record #:
27558
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Triangle area is facing landfill shortages. Voluntary recycling has increased in the Triangle over the last few years, but by 2013, Durham, Raleigh, and Chapel Hill will see all of their landfills filled. The Triangle and area politicians need to get serious about waste reduction and recycling efforts.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 32, October 12-18 1989, p8-10, 12 Periodical Website
Record #:
34064
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is moving towards waste reduction and pollution prevention measures, because it is more cost-effective to avoid producing waste than to clean or treat waste. Representatives of the North Carolina Pollution Prevention Program and the Hazardous Waste Management Branch believe obstacles to adopt waste reduction/pollution prevention as a national priority may have become institutionalized.
Record #:
33471
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s Pollution Prevention Pays Program has been cited as the nation’s most comprehensive and most focused on waste reduction. The program targets all forms of waste and works with local governments and state agencies, as well as business and industry. The program offers industries financial incentives, and supports university research aimed at developing techniques to reduce the generation of hazardous waste and prevent pollution.
Record #:
33486
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Environmental Management revised their 1985 report on animal operations and water quality to include recommendations that could bring about an increase in the number of North Carolina animal operations designated “concentrated” and thereby potentially subject to National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit regulations. The recommended changes would also result in better data for determining the impact animal operations have on the state’s water quality.
Record #:
33482
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina legislature is expected to take action on legislation concerning use of phosphate detergent, low-level radioactive waste disposal, hazardous chemical waste treatment and hazardous waste orphan site cleanup, leaking underground storage tanks, landfill regulation, and pesticide contamination.