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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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20 results for "Poultry industry"
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Record #:
31415
Author(s):
Abstract:
It is estimated that 100,000 laying hens will create an estimated $1.3 million worth of business annually. But with over 11 million laying hens in North Carolina, income from eggs, feed, electricity, and packaging is estimated to be over $140 million annually.
Subject(s):
Record #:
31470
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two agricultural engineers at North Carolina State University have designed, built and tested a new poultry house that could cut energy costs by millions of dollars. Michael Timmons and Gerald Baughman built their “flex house” to combine the advantages of naturally ventilated and enclosed housing for poultry production. Some key features are an insulated, flexible side wall curtain and a controllable ventilator.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 14 Issue 2, Feb 1982, p16, por
Record #:
31634
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s turkey industry has been expanding since the late 1940s and the current growth rate is well ahead of that for the nation. With five turkey processing plants and nearly fifteen-million turkeys raised last year, North Carolina is expected to rank second in turkey production.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 11, Nov 1976, p21, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
32166
Author(s):
Abstract:
Grady Fowler and Ben Venable of Surry County came up with an idea for an automatic egg gathering system. Their invention, called the Fowler Venable System, consists of nesting units which constitute the conveyor, the conveyor drive, and a vacuum system which cleans the conveyor after each cycle. The new system is being tested by various poultry companies, and is expected to drastically improve efficiency and work operations.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 3 Issue 7, July 1971, p8-9, il
Record #:
36559
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite being labeled as organic and regarded as more profitable by large poultry producers, the author asserts slower growing chickens is the better breed. Benefits for standard bred heritage chickens: stronger skeletal structure, normal organ development, greater muscle mass and meat texture, and stronger immune systems. Benefits for farmers and consumers are genetic sustainability and better taste, respectively.