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8 results for "Lexington--Description and travel"
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Record #:
14662
Abstract:
Lexington was the county seat for Davidson and in 1947 home to 15,000 residents. It was settled in the mid-18th-century but not chartered until 1827. Much progress had been made since and in 1947 the future was bright for Lexington. Textile mills and furniture manufacturers, as well as agriculture were major economic booms for Lexington in 1947. Also of interest was the newly completed hospital in that same year.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 39, Feb 1947, p21-35, il
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Record #:
35853
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Abstract:
Railroading in this case involved Pullman cars. Riding the rails the fashioned way was still possible through the National Railroad Historic Society and smaller model railroad groups. Highlighting the difference of the train experience not by Amtrak were factors involved with steam and coal power locomotives. Illustrating the uniqueness also was a description of a trip starting in Roanoke and ending in Greensboro.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p17-19
Record #:
5753
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Abstract:
To many people, the cities of High Point, Thomasville, and Lexington mean furniture, but there are also other things to see and do. Kunkel describes how to spend a weekend among the three cities.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 10, Mar 2003, p124-126, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
1923
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Abstract:
On one Saturday every October, residents of Lexington welcome visitors around the nation to the Lexington Barbecue Festival, which celebrates the beauty of tomato-based barbecue.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 5, Oct 1994, p20-21
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Record #:
4062
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Abstract:
Lexington has always been famous for its old-fashioned southern barbecue, and during the annual Barbecue Festival in October, over 120,000 people fill its eighteen barbecue restaurants. Now two additional attractions have come to town, the Bob Timberlake Gallery and the Richard Childress Racing Museum. Both attract over 100,000 yearly.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 1, Jan 1999, p44, il
Record #:
11148
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lexington, county seat of Davidson County, is OUR STATE magazine's featured Tar Heel town of the month. The city, known as the \"Barbecue Capital of the World,\" attracts over 100,000 people yearly to its Barbecue Festival. Other places to visit include the Bob Timberlake Gallery, the Childress Vineyards, and The Candy Factory.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 1, June 2009, p24-26, 28, 30, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
13452
Abstract:
When Davidson was formed, Lexington became the county seat and commenced a process of methodical growth still experienced today. Inhabited by a mix of Pennsylvania Dutch and Scotch-Irish, Lexington was named in honor of the Battle of Lexington in 1775. Lexington's primary industries became textiles and furniture, while its recreation is found in politics.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 19, Feb 1962, p15-16, il
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Record #:
16953
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lexington, located in Davidson County, is featured in THE STATE's series on North Carolina cities. Witherspoon discusses industrial activities, school facilities, agricultural resources, and finances.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 1, June 1937, p21-27, il
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