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64 results for "Environmental protection"
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Record #:
25306
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Abstract:
Bill Hunneke describes ways that Pamlico-Tar River Foundation members can help give the foundation a bigger presences in their communities.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 26 Issue 4, Fall 2007, p5, il
Record #:
3169
Author(s):
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Carolina Trout Company is appealing the Tennessee Valley Authority's denial of their request to place commercial trout farms in public lakes, including Fontana. The authority believes that the farms could adversely affect the environment.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 45 Issue 1, Winter 1997, p3,5, il
Record #:
34223
Author(s):
Abstract:
A study for the North Carolina Coastal Resources Commission in1988 showed less than 12,000 acres of maritime forest remaining in North Carolina and found most of it in private ownership. The study predicted that at the current rate of development on barrier islands, most of the privately owned maritime forests would be destroyed or significantly altered in the next decade. Recommendations include developing local ordinances to protect the forests or acquire tracts of the forest.
Record #:
27624
Author(s):
Abstract:
The draft rules on fracking in North Carolina are rife with loopholes that favor the drillers and could endanger the public health and the environment. Public hearings in Raleigh have focused on the shortcomings of the Mining and Energy Commission’s draft rules. Rules prevent the public from knowing chemicals released into water supplies unless there is an emergency, require little testing of the water supply, make finding and enforcing violations difficult, and are weak on the handling of hazardous wastes. Specific shortcomings and their effect on citizens, the water supply, and the environment are discussed in detail.
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Record #:
15932
Author(s):
Abstract:
A recent study and survey found that North Carolinians are equally concerned with the extension of economic growth and development as well as concern for the environment.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Fall 1990, p14
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Record #:
27962
Author(s):
Abstract:
Offshore drilling may come to North Carolina in the future. The potential prospects for drilling for gas and oil off the coast of North Carolina are currently being explored. The Point off the shore of Hatteras Island is an area of particular interest to drilling companies, but the area is an environmentally sensitive area. Even if North Carolina does not allow drilling or allows drilling in areas other than The Point, all of the state’s coast, environment, and economy are at risk if other states drill for oil or gas and a spill occurs. An in-depth look at the impact offshore drilling could have on the state is detailed.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 26, June 2010, p14-17 Periodical Website
Record #:
1422
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Southern Appalachian Mountain Initiative is a state-driven voluntary group created by eight southeastern states, including N.C. The organization seeks to foster a cooperative, non-regulatory approach to development and environmental protection.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 2, Feb 1994, p12-16, il
Record #:
779
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1991, Big Sweep volunteers gathered 212 tons of trash from the waterways of North Carolina. North Carolina officials are hoping the 1992 sweep will be as successful.
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Record #:
27564
Author(s):
Abstract:
Billie Rogers and Margaret Pollard are lobbying for pesticide regulations based on a common-sense respect for life. In 1985, the Gorgus residents were victims of pesticide spraying by the Boise Cascade paper company which caused health and environmental problems in their community. The state denied that his occurred and suppressed reports that a direct spray occurred. Rogers and Pollard are lobbying to increase the buffer zone around homes from 100 to 300 feet to protect public health.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 37, November 16-22 1989, p8 Periodical Website
Record #:
25302
Author(s):
Abstract:
Former director of the Pamlico-Tar River Foundation Jim Stephenson reflects on his years as director of the PTRF. He covers everything from what he did with the PTRF to why he left and what the experience taught him.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 26 Issue 2, Spring 2007, p7, por
Record #:
27485
Author(s):
Abstract:
As a result of the health problems at the Caldwell Systems, Inc. incinerator in Caldwell County, the Environmental Protection Agency is launching a nationwide “strike force.” This will trigger a nationwide review of incinerators and their effect on local populations. The NC case could be the case that leads to radical changes in hazardous waste management. A strategy calling for waste reduction and recycling is favored by experts as the hazardous waste totals are increasing nationwide.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 32, August 8-14 1990, p9-10 Periodical Website
Record #:
25208
Author(s):
Abstract:
To combat new potential forms of pollution, a new water quality study program involving the citizens of the Albemarle, Pamlico, and Neuse River Sounds are taking action in new ways.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Fall 1993, p6
Record #:
4976
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are fourteen coal-fired power plants in North Carolina, with Carolina Power and Light and Duke Power having seven each. Rules adopted in October 2000 require these plants to emit 69 percent less nitrogen oxide in five years than currently. The challenge in doing this is whether the aging plants can reduce ozone-causing gases and still keep the power flowing.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 59 Issue 2, Feb 2001, p18-19, 22-23, il
Record #:
27563
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recognizing the need to protect the environment has been a big issue in 1989. Some argue that protecting the environment slows economic growth in the Triangle and hurts the working class who need the jobs and the benefits of growth. With this article as an introduction to the 1989 Citizen Awards, The Independent recognizes five individuals and one group who work in the Triangle to protect the environment and the economy in the following articles.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 37, November 16-22 1989, p6 Periodical Website
Record #:
7804
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two of the state's Touchstone Energy cooperatives received recognition for the care they take in the management of trees and other vegetation affecting power lines and poles. Union Power Cooperative is the first North Carolina utility to be named a Tree Line USA Utility. This award is sponsored by the National Arbor Day Foundation and the National Association of State Foresters. The Dow AgroSciences industry magazine, Right-of-Way Vistas, recognized Pee Dee Electric for its right-of-way vegetation management program. The cooperatives serve a region between Charlotte and Lumberton.
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