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9 results for "Chinqua-Penn Plantation (Reidsville)"
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Record #:
9651
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Built in the 1920s by Betsy and Thomas Jefferson Penn, Chinqua-Penn Plantation in Rockingham County is a unique blend of gardens, architecture, and works of art, including tapestries and reverse-glass paintings. Calvin and Lisa Phelps bought the property in 2006 and have plans for a winery and overnight accommodations.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 8, Jan 2008, p114-116, 118, 120-121, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8485
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Chinqua-Penn Plantation, closed since 2002 due to lack of funding, was reopened in 2006 by its new owners, Calvin and Lisa Phelps. Phelps, CEO of three companies, purchased the building and the twenty-five surrounding acres from N.C. State University for $4.1 million. The twenty-seven-room mansion, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was built in the 1920s by Betsy and Thomas Jefferson Penn and is a blend of gardens, architecture, and works of art. The Phelps plan to use Chinqua-Penn in a variety of ways, including group tours, weddings, corporate retreats, meetings, and photography opportunities.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 1, Jan 2007, p57, il
Record #:
3792
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Reidsville's Chinqua-Penn Plantation is Rockingham County's main tourist attraction. Built in the 1920s by Betsy and Thomas Jefferson Penn, the 27-room mansion is a blend of gardens, architecture, and works of art.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 8, Aug 1998, p24-25, il
Record #:
2986
Author(s):
Abstract:
Built in the 1920s by Betsy and Thomas Jefferson Penn, Chinqua-Penn Plantation in Rockingham County is a unique blend of gardens, architecture, and works of art, including tapestries and reverse-glass paintings.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 64 Issue 3, Aug 1996, p24-26, il
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Record #:
1785
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On July 1 the Chinqua-Penn Plantation in Rockingham County opened its doors to the public after a two-year hiatus resulting from budget shortfalls. A June 30 gala marked the occasion of the tourist attraction's return.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 3, Aug 1994, p4, bibl
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Record #:
1261
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The Chinqua-Penn Plantation near Reidsville is an early 20th-century country estate that was closed to the public in 1991 when the General Assembly cancelled its appropriations.
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Record #:
3366
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Built in the 1920s, Chinqua-Penn Plantation is a 27-room mansion surrounded by 36 acres. It contains a treasure trove of art, including Chinese life-size statues, tapestries, and a Byzantine mosaic.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 57 Issue 12, May 1990, p33-35, il
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Record #:
35727
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Whether interested in natural world or NC’s rich history, Wise asserted the Piedmont region catered to both. Historic sites highlighted included the Reed Gold Mine, site of the first gold discovery in the US; Chinqua-Penn Plantation, which contained art from around the globe; and Bennett Place, reconstructed Civil War site for General Johnson’s surrender to General Sherman. Nature and science lovers could be sated through Mount Morrow State Park; North Carolina Zoo, first state-owned zoo in the US; and Museum of Life and Natural Science, which contained the greatest treasure trove of outer space memorabilia.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p19, 41
Record #:
8581
Author(s):
Abstract:
Chinqua-Penn Plantation near Reidsville is one of North Carolina's most popular tourist and visitor attractions. It was the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jefferson Penn, who, in their extensive travels around the world, purchased a wide variety of art, including Chinese life-size statues, tapestries, and a Byzantine mosaic. Many of the twenty-seven rooms in the house showcase this art collection. Five greenhouses are used in the care and development of the plantation's gardens. In 1959, Mrs. Penn donated the plantation to the Consolidated University, although she continued to live there until her death in 1965.
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