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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for Sullivan, Lee A
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Record #:
1889
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina resident death certificate data for the period 1980-1989 were used to draw conclusions regarding the roles that age, race, and sex play in diabetes-related mortality; and regarding recent temporal trends.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 61, Dec 1991, p1-24, il, bibl
Record #:
1890
Author(s):
Abstract:
A more comprehensive way to inventory birth defects is now available through the new North Carolina Birth Defects Registry, which provides data to health professionals and others studying causes of specific birth defects.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 52, Sept 1989, p1-15, il, bibl, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
1920
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's Division of Blind Services maintains one of the only population-based registers for the diabetes-related visually-impaired in the U.S. Sullivan discusses the register's usefulness and its flaws.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 71, Jan 1993, p1-8, bibl
Record #:
24879
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lee Sullivan conducts a state-wide survey on instances of diabetes related mortality and morbidity. The number of hospitalizations is found to vary based on age, sex, and place of residence.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. 69 Issue , July 1992, p1-18, il, map, bibl, f
Record #:
1930
Abstract:
This study examines the prevalence of maternal diabetes in North Carolina, as estimated from vital records and hospital discharge reports, and describes some of the major demographic risk factors in the pregnant population.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 64, May 1992, p1-8, il, bibl
Subject(s):
Record #:
29413
Abstract:
North Carolina is experiencing major changes in its age structure as life expectancies have increased, birth rates decreased, and population migration occurred. Between 1980 and 2010, the number of North Carolina residents sixty-five and older is expected to dramatically increase. This report examined cause-specific mortality rates for three elderly age groups by race and sex.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 51, June 1989, p1-39, bibl, f